• Is it true that the East Coast is going to have a Nor'Eastern right around Christmas?

    Best answer: I work as a private meteorologist and forecaster. (Also from Maryland) What I can tell you right now is that some models are saying yes, while others are saying no. Is the potential there? Absolutely. Winter storms are very difficult to forecast (Nor"easters especially) because they usually do not form until a day or two prior to... show more
    Best answer: I work as a private meteorologist and forecaster. (Also from Maryland) What I can tell you right now is that some models are saying yes, while others are saying no. Is the potential there? Absolutely. Winter storms are very difficult to forecast (Nor"easters especially) because they usually do not form until a day or two prior to impacting the Northeast. If I had to put money on it right now, I would say that is would likely be a cold rain event for the Maryland area, with interior regions in New England having the best shot for snow. The problem is that we are really lacking in sufficient cold air supply to get that rain to change over to snow, but there is still plenty of time between now and mid-week next week (Dec 17-19 is what most models are pointing to, so several days before Christmas) to have the right ingredients come together.
    1 answer · Weather · 5 years ago
  • Coriolis effect and hurricanes?

    Best answer: As you should have learned in your course, the Coriolis force is weakest at the equator, and then the force increases as you head towards either pole. At the equator, and within about 5 degrees north and south of it, the force is too weak to get the atmosphere turning, so the winds in this region simply bow from high pressure towards low... show more
    Best answer: As you should have learned in your course, the Coriolis force is weakest at the equator, and then the force increases as you head towards either pole. At the equator, and within about 5 degrees north and south of it, the force is too weak to get the atmosphere turning, so the winds in this region simply bow from high pressure towards low pressure, called the Pressure Gradient Force, without the Coriolis force interfering. To sum it up, because of weak Coriolis force at the equator, you don't get the atmospheric rotation necessary for storm development, so your answer to the question above is "was". hope it helps!
    4 answers · Weather · 7 years ago
  • How does warm water in the pacific cause nthe weather patterns of El Nino?

    Best answer: If I wrote it all here i would literally have to sit here for upward of two hours writing all this information. There are so many different things that affect el nino. That is why I love links! Its not just the currents, but the atmosphere above as well. No one knows more about el nino then the NOAA. Here is a link to their site on el... show more
    Best answer: If I wrote it all here i would literally have to sit here for upward of two hours writing all this information. There are so many different things that affect el nino. That is why I love links! Its not just the currents, but the atmosphere above as well. No one knows more about el nino then the NOAA. Here is a link to their site on el nino. I'm sure you will be able to find all of the information that you need, and from a reliable source, not Wikipedia. Make sure you check out the links on the right also, lots of useful information and animations! Good luck on the project! http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/elnino/el-n...
    1 answer · Weather · 7 years ago
  • How close was i when thunder stuck?

    Best answer: Well the speed of sound travels at ~1130 feet per second. So depending on if it was one or two seconds, you were about 3 to 6 NFL football field lengths (360ft) away from it. So you were about just under a quarter mile to under half a mile away from the strike via simple math. This is somewhat close, but you were not in any real danger,... show more
    Best answer: Well the speed of sound travels at ~1130 feet per second. So depending on if it was one or two seconds, you were about 3 to 6 NFL football field lengths (360ft) away from it. So you were about just under a quarter mile to under half a mile away from the strike via simple math. This is somewhat close, but you were not in any real danger, unless you were outside or in water. But if you want to see really really close lightning, check out this link... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDJkmqPdU...
    3 answers · Weather · 7 years ago
  • Rain Shadow Desertification?

    Best answer: Rain shadow desertification is what happens when land becomes abundantly dry because it is located in a rain shadow. What exactly does this mean? Take a look at this diagram http://www.sequimwa.com/_assets/img/content/Rainshadow_copy.jpg This is what happens. Air abundant with moisture hits a range of mountains. Because of the... show more
    Best answer: Rain shadow desertification is what happens when land becomes abundantly dry because it is located in a rain shadow. What exactly does this mean? Take a look at this diagram http://www.sequimwa.com/_assets/img/cont... This is what happens. Air abundant with moisture hits a range of mountains. Because of the mountain, the air is forced up. Now if we imagine the air like it was a stack of boxes on top of one another, each box being a "parcel" of air. When our bottom box of air is forced up, so is the one on top of it, and the one on top of it, etc etc. Basically we force a whole column of air to rise the length of the mountains. As air rises, it cools at a varying rate but a good estimate is at about ~6 degrees Celsius per km. If the mountains are high enough, this air will cool and the moisture within it will condense until the temperature reaches the dew point temperature. Once this happens, it will begin to precipitate. Now often time this does not occur at the top of the mountain, so the rain will only come down on one side of the mountain! Now by the time our air has finally been pushed up and over the mountain, it is out of moisture and now dry, and cannot precipitate any more. This creates wet conditions on one side of the mountain, and if the mountains are tall enough, a bone dry desert on the other side. Here is a great visual example of how the Himalayas, the tallest mountain range in the world, (the snow white line in the bottom of the picture) creates moist conditions on one side of the mountain (the green area at the very bottom of the picture) and a desert thanks to a rain shadow (the middle of the picture) http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/co... I hope this helps you out!
    1 answer · Weather · 7 years ago
  • What exactly is lake effect?

    Best answer: I assume you are referring to the lake effect snows that happen around the Great Lakes region this time of year. Lake effect snow is snow that forms directly because of the lake. This happens because that lake is often much warmer then the cold air which is above it. As wind blows air over the lake, it warms the air slightly. As the wind... show more
    Best answer: I assume you are referring to the lake effect snows that happen around the Great Lakes region this time of year. Lake effect snow is snow that forms directly because of the lake. This happens because that lake is often much warmer then the cold air which is above it. As wind blows air over the lake, it warms the air slightly. As the wind continues to push the now "warm" air over the land mass the surrounds the lake, the warm air is forced to rise, since temperatures over the land are cooler then over the water, and warm air is less dense then cold air. As the warm air rises, it cools and condenses, and we get our lake effect snow showers. Typically we need the Great Lakes to be about 13 degrees Fahrenheit warmer then the air temperature before we see lake effect snow. There are many more factors that go into Lake Effect snow, but this is the basic concept.
    1 answer · Weather · 7 years ago
  • How much snow does the Purdue university area typically get each winter?

    Best answer: You get a good mix. Sometimes you will get a winter with a lot of snow, sometimes you won't. Purdue is located in West Lafayette, IN, which according to the NOAA has about 22.3 inches of snow per year, which is a pretty good average in terms of snowfall.
    Best answer: You get a good mix. Sometimes you will get a winter with a lot of snow, sometimes you won't. Purdue is located in West Lafayette, IN, which according to the NOAA has about 22.3 inches of snow per year, which is a pretty good average in terms of snowfall.
    2 answers · Weather · 7 years ago
  • What type of air mass does Florida usually experience?

    Best answer: It is surrounded by water, and is located in a warm, tropical region. So Florida usually experiences Maritime Tropical (mT) air masses. So your answer is c.
    Best answer: It is surrounded by water, and is located in a warm, tropical region. So Florida usually experiences Maritime Tropical (mT) air masses. So your answer is c.
    1 answer · Weather · 7 years ago
  • Air Masses- Describe?

    Best answer: They are called "Continental Tropical" air masses. Here is the basic run down for ya. Air masses a named in A + B format. Part A will always be either... Continental - Means the air mass originated over a land region. Maritime - Means the air mass originated over water and Part B will always be... show more
    Best answer: They are called "Continental Tropical" air masses. Here is the basic run down for ya. Air masses a named in A + B format. Part A will always be either... Continental - Means the air mass originated over a land region. Maritime - Means the air mass originated over water and Part B will always be either... Tropical - Warm air mass Polar - Cold air mass. There are a few other more specific ones, but these are the basics. Hope it helps!
    1 answer · Weather · 7 years ago
  • Help me read a surface weather map? 10 points to best answer?

    Best answer: The winds across south Texas and Louisiana are primarily out of the south. More specifically, in eastern Louisiana, the winds are calm, in north western Louisiana, winds are from the east-south-east at 5 knots. In southern Texas, winds are out of the south-east at 5 knots. A little further north, they are calm, and then in northern... show more
    Best answer: The winds across south Texas and Louisiana are primarily out of the south. More specifically, in eastern Louisiana, the winds are calm, in north western Louisiana, winds are from the east-south-east at 5 knots. In southern Texas, winds are out of the south-east at 5 knots. A little further north, they are calm, and then in northern Texas, they are out of the south at 10 knots primarily. To describe them as a whole I would say it was a average day with a light a variable southerly wind blowing. The coldest temperatures are located in southern Canada around the high pressure center, while the warmest temperatures are located out ahead of the cold front in the southern United States. Northern New York is looking at snowy conditions in the short term with the low pressure system moving through, while Oregon will similarly be looking at cloudy and rainy conditions. To learn how to read a simple weather map such as this, check out this site. It will really help you! http://www.wikihow.com/Read-a-Weather-Ma...
    3 answers · Weather · 7 years ago
  • Where does warm and cold air advection occur?

    Best answer: Warm advection always happens out ahead of a cold front. This is do to the fact that, in the northern hemisphere, the counter clockwise flow around a low pressure system causes a southerly component to the winds in this region. (Aka winds will be out of the south, so coming from the nice and warm equator region) For the same reason,... show more
    Best answer: Warm advection always happens out ahead of a cold front. This is do to the fact that, in the northern hemisphere, the counter clockwise flow around a low pressure system causes a southerly component to the winds in this region. (Aka winds will be out of the south, so coming from the nice and warm equator region) For the same reason, winds behind a cold front will have mainly a northerly component, causing cold advection to take place. Basically when we talk about air advection we are talking about whether or not the air in a particular region is going to get warmer or colder over time. Check out this like for a visual representation. http://www.muhs.acsu.k12.vt.us/academics... Hope it helps!
    4 answers · Weather · 7 years ago
  • If you see high or low pressure areas on a weather map,what can you predict about the weather in those areas?

    Best answer: My man below here is somewhat correct, however he fails to mention why. First off, low pressure systems do not always bring severe weather, but often they do bring rain and sometimes stormy weather, but it is good to assume that there are clouds in the vicinity of low pressure centers. This is because low pressure systems are mechanisms... show more
    Best answer: My man below here is somewhat correct, however he fails to mention why. First off, low pressure systems do not always bring severe weather, but often they do bring rain and sometimes stormy weather, but it is good to assume that there are clouds in the vicinity of low pressure centers. This is because low pressure systems are mechanisms of LIFTING. They send air from the surface up into the upper atmosphere, where it then cools, condenses, and forms clouds. If the air mass being lifted is unstable enough, yes you will get your storms, but it is primarily due to the face that weather systems lift air that you can assume miserable weather. Low pressure systems also carry fronts, cold fronts and warm fronts, that can extend for hundred to thousands of miles. These systems directly associated with the low pressure system are also reasons that you can assume poor weather in low pressure systems. On the opposite end, high pressure systems are mechanisms of SINKING. Due to upper level convergence, high pressure centers tend to "push" air down from high altitudes towards the ground. This creates a stable atmosphere, since if air is sinking there is no way it can rise, meaning that there will not be any chance for any organized cloud formation. This is why you can assume that good, sunny weather is associated with high pressure systems. Also, you cannot just assume high winds by looking at high and low pressure on a map, you have to look at the pressure gradient that surrounds them. The more isobars (lines of equal pressure on a map) then the more likely one is to experience high winds. Hope it helps!
    3 answers · Weather · 7 years ago
  • How to calulate divergence?

    Best answer: The most common for of the divergence equation is that which is used for Horizontal Divergence. This is a very simple equation, simply (du/dx+dv/dy) or in vector form (del)h [dot product] V....where del and V are vectors. Lets stick with the simple form. This simply means the change in the wind speed along the u direction (east-west... show more
    Best answer: The most common for of the divergence equation is that which is used for Horizontal Divergence. This is a very simple equation, simply (du/dx+dv/dy) or in vector form (del)h [dot product] V....where del and V are vectors. Lets stick with the simple form. This simply means the change in the wind speed along the u direction (east-west direction) over a given distance in that same direction (E-W). Similarly, v is the change in wind speed in the v direction (north-south) over a given distance in that same direction (N-S). Thats it, very simple equation to use. Now if your also bringing vertical divergence into the equation, thats a whole different story, and simply add this to you question if this is the case and I will try and explain that as best I can (hard to explain without a chalkboard) but for introductory meteorology classes, the horizontal divergence equation is the one that is used most often.
    1 answer · Weather · 7 years ago
  • Homework Help? Weather Data and the type of data they collect?

    Best answer: 1) ASOS (or Automated Surface Observing System) are located at thousands of airports across the country. They gather data such as temperature, wind speed and direction, pressure, pressure change, rainfall, current weather conditions, visibility, vertical visibility, dew point, and cloud cover. 2) Satellites like GOES east and GOES... show more
    Best answer: 1) ASOS (or Automated Surface Observing System) are located at thousands of airports across the country. They gather data such as temperature, wind speed and direction, pressure, pressure change, rainfall, current weather conditions, visibility, vertical visibility, dew point, and cloud cover. 2) Satellites like GOES east and GOES west can help meteorologist see clouds over the united states and its neighboring oceans in visible, infrared, and water vapor wavelengths. They also have sounders attached which give us a vertical profile of the winds at a location. (Can only be used when no clouds though) 3) Doppler Radars allow us to see the reflectivity of approaching systems which allows us to determine how heavy the rainfall is in a particular area. They also allow us to see which parts of the storm are moving towards or away from us which can allow us to detect things like tornadoes. All of these instruments provide weather data for meteorologists Hope it helps!
    1 answer · Weather · 7 years ago
  • At standard temperature and pressure?

    Best answer: Use Ideal Gas Law. PV = nRT P is your pressure, but in Pascals, not atm. 1 Atm = 101325 Pascals. V is our volume in meters cubed. 1 m^3 = 1000 L, so 22.4 L is 0.0224 m^3 (not relevant here, but fyi) n is the number of moles of the substance. R is a constant, 8.314 J / (K * mol) T is temperature in Kelvins. K = C +... show more
    Best answer: Use Ideal Gas Law. PV = nRT P is your pressure, but in Pascals, not atm. 1 Atm = 101325 Pascals. V is our volume in meters cubed. 1 m^3 = 1000 L, so 22.4 L is 0.0224 m^3 (not relevant here, but fyi) n is the number of moles of the substance. R is a constant, 8.314 J / (K * mol) T is temperature in Kelvins. K = C + 273.15...so 273.15 + 55 = 328.15 K Now lets plug in (101325 Pa) (V) = (1 mol) (8.314 J / (K * mol)) ( 328.15 K) Now lets rearrange and simplify V = (2728.2391 J) / (101325 Pa) V = 0.0269 m^3 V = 26.93 L (answer)
    2 answers · Weather · 7 years ago
  • What is the weather like before, during, and after a warm front?

    Best answer: Depends on the strength of the warm front. Typically before a warm from you will get these small high altitude cirrus clouds that will start to dot the sky. Slowly more and more cloud cover will move into the area, building up as the warm from approaches. As the warm from passes over head (aka "during the warm front") you will... show more
    Best answer: Depends on the strength of the warm front. Typically before a warm from you will get these small high altitude cirrus clouds that will start to dot the sky. Slowly more and more cloud cover will move into the area, building up as the warm from approaches. As the warm from passes over head (aka "during the warm front") you will typically see a line of rain showers or drizzle pass through. Once the front moves on, things typically clear up (at least until the cold front arrives) and you are left with warmer temperatures then before, how much warmer once again depends on the strength of the warm front. Here is a great illustration of what you can expect to see with a warm front. http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http...
    3 answers · Weather · 7 years ago
  • When are we gonna get another good winter?

    Best answer: I too am from the Washington DC area and was in DC last year during our 3 blizzard winter. The first blizzard struck just before Christmas that dumped nearly 20 inches of snow on us. The 2ed and 3ed storms both stuck in the same week, combining for what seemed like a super blizzard, and we got 3 feet of snow where I live just north of DC... show more
    Best answer: I too am from the Washington DC area and was in DC last year during our 3 blizzard winter. The first blizzard struck just before Christmas that dumped nearly 20 inches of snow on us. The 2ed and 3ed storms both stuck in the same week, combining for what seemed like a super blizzard, and we got 3 feet of snow where I live just north of DC during that one. I'll start by telling you just how rare that is. VERY. It almost never happens. Washington DC has not seen that much snow in one season in several decades. It was a recored breaking snow for a reason, it just does not happen that often. I will give you a little hope by reminding you that in recent years around Washington DC, the worst of the winter weather tends to come in February, which we are are still a week away from, so all hope is not lost for this season. However, we are in a slight La Nina, meaning that our region is usually drier then normal, hence less snowfall. We have a better chance of seeing more significant snow when there is an El Nino, because it typically leads to an abundance of moisture over our region, increasing the risk for a big storm. To sum it all up, here in DC we see a large scale storm of 15 inches or more only about 2 to 4 times a decade on average. More typically, we see about 1 medium size storm a year, that will bring us around 8-12 inches, along with a few minor storms that will bring us anything less then 8 inches. Sorry to say this, but that super storm that we saw last year is such a rare occurrence that we might not see another one like it for a quarter of a century or longer. Its not often that you get 36 inches of snow from one storm, and I know my parents who are both age 50 and grew up around the area said they had never seen that much snow before in their lifetime, so we may have gotten our lifetime storm. However, that is the beautiful thing about meteorology,is that what is going to happen 2 weeks down the road is nearly a complete mystery to us. Sure we have models that can give us an idea, but we truly don't have a confident idea about what is going to happen until around 3 day before it does happen, which is when most models start to get consistent. So why I am telling you today that there is a slim chance you will ever get that much stow out of a storm again in the next decade, two weeks from now you could be buried in snow! And I really do hope that we are, because I love that snow and wish we had a storm like that every year! Hope it helps.
    3 answers · Weather · 7 years ago
  • How do you read a Surface Weather Map?

    Best answer: 1) Pressure is always lowest right at the center of a low, so as you move away from it, it increases. 2) That is a cold front, and the people living in SC can expect the weather to get colder once it passes. 3) Stars or asterisks on a weather map indicate snowfall. 4.... a) The temperature is to the left and on top of... show more
    Best answer: 1) Pressure is always lowest right at the center of a low, so as you move away from it, it increases. 2) That is a cold front, and the people living in SC can expect the weather to get colder once it passes. 3) Stars or asterisks on a weather map indicate snowfall. 4.... a) The temperature is to the left and on top of the symbol, so 75 degrees F b) Wind if blowing from the southeast c) One full flag and half a flag is a wind speed of 15 knots d) 902.3 mb would be too low, so your pressure (located in the upper right) must be 1002.3 mb e) Half a circle means 50% cloud cover, or more specifically four eights could cover (aka 4/8) f) The given symbol means the station is currently going through a thunderstorm. 5) Youngstown is 5 hours behind Z-time, so it would have been observed at 19Z 07 Feb 2000 6) High pressure systems in the Northern Hemisphere all have winds that rotate clockwise, and wind also move outward from them. 7) St Louis had wind from the North and Sea Level Pressure was 1028.6 mb 8) North Platte is the answer for both a and b 9) Cooler 10) Decreases 11) Winds around low pressure systems in the northern hemisphere always blow counter clockwise and inward towards. 12) North-Northeast (The red semi circles tell you what way it is moving) 13) Nagagami has the higher RH but Key West is holding the greater quantity of water.
    1 answer · Weather · 7 years ago
  • What kind of meteorologists are there?

    Best answer: Hey, Glad to hear this interests you, as I remember growing up I thought the same thing as you. Generally speaking, there are six different "options" when you do Meteorology. I have posted a link that has the six options for you to click on in the source below, this way you can explore the website yourself. In terms... show more
    Best answer: Hey, Glad to hear this interests you, as I remember growing up I thought the same thing as you. Generally speaking, there are six different "options" when you do Meteorology. I have posted a link that has the six options for you to click on in the source below, this way you can explore the website yourself. In terms of colleges that you would go to for meteorology, one of the best is Penn State (of which I am a proud alumni) because they have AccuWeather Headquarters right down the street. The have a lot of experts who have worked all over, and their alumni are literally everywhere in the world of weather. From a personal experience, I can tell you that they prepare you quite well for the world of weather, but it is a tough program. Some other schools I have heard are good though are Cornell and Oklahoma. In terms of courses, you better learn to love math. There is more math and physics in the weather world then I ever thought their would be when I first got into it. You will take at the very least Calculus 1, 2, and 3 as well as Differential Equations, which will make you miss the high school algebra classes. You will also take at least 2 semesters of physics and a semester of chemistry at the very least. You should also be well versed in computer programming, as I took 2 semesters of that as well. It may seem tough, but it is really cool seeing how all the mathematics plays out in the real world, and was well worth it in my opinion.
    1 answer · Weather · 7 years ago
  • Is there a rule of thumb for the relationship of air temperature to water temperature? (for an outdoor pool)?

    Best answer: Ignore the spammer above. Sorry there is no "rule of thumb". What I can tell you is that the water resists temperature change much more then air does, so a pool will cool/warm slower then the air around it. If you want a good estimate look at temperatures of about 4 days before the event. In this string of days, is it warm or... show more
    Best answer: Ignore the spammer above. Sorry there is no "rule of thumb". What I can tell you is that the water resists temperature change much more then air does, so a pool will cool/warm slower then the air around it. If you want a good estimate look at temperatures of about 4 days before the event. In this string of days, is it warm or cold? For example, if you have a string of 60 degree days leading up to Dec 1st, then on Dec 1st the temperature is 45 degrees, the pool will actually feel warmer then the air outside, due to this effect. There are also a lot of other factors, such as size of the pool (the more water it holds, the slower the temperature will change.) If there was any rain a day or so before the event, that could also effect the temperature, then say if the sun had been out for 4 days. Now I don't want to make it sound like 60 degree water is warm or anything, in fact its quite chilly.
    2 answers · Weather · 7 years ago