• Help me remember the name of a movie?

    6 answers · Movies · 3 weeks ago
  • Is something wrong with the global warming section?

    The reason I ask is there doesn't appear to be any new questions in ages!!
    The reason I ask is there doesn't appear to be any new questions in ages!!
    6 answers · Global Warming · 7 months ago
  • How do I find the number of combinations of numbers that add to give a value?

    Suppose I have an equation something like a+b+c+d = 33, where a,b,c,d are positive integers between 1 and 10 ... how do I determine mathematically the number of solutions within those constraints? I know it must involve something like n!/(n-r!)r! ... Also, how would I modify it to account for more or less additions (a+b+c+d+e+f, for example) or if... show more
    Suppose I have an equation something like a+b+c+d = 33, where a,b,c,d are positive integers between 1 and 10 ... how do I determine mathematically the number of solutions within those constraints? I know it must involve something like n!/(n-r!)r! ... Also, how would I modify it to account for more or less additions (a+b+c+d+e+f, for example) or if the integers were 1-100 etc? Thanks! Been driving me mental ...
    2 answers · Mathematics · 3 years ago
  • Help with simple looking (but not!) problem?

    Let's suppose I have two tables X and Y. Both tables contain two elements so X = (5,3) and Y = (4,1). Now suppose I don't know the values of the elements. But I do know the results of their addition. So I can write four equations representing the addition of each combination of table elements: x1 + y1 = 9 x1 + y2 = 6 x2 + y1 = 7 x2 + y2 =... show more
    Let's suppose I have two tables X and Y. Both tables contain two elements so X = (5,3) and Y = (4,1). Now suppose I don't know the values of the elements. But I do know the results of their addition. So I can write four equations representing the addition of each combination of table elements: x1 + y1 = 9 x1 + y2 = 6 x2 + y1 = 7 x2 + y2 = 4 Am I right in thinking, actually, I can't work out the table elements based on these equations other than by making a 'logical guess' at the value of one of them?
    2 answers · Mathematics · 3 years ago
  • How do planes navigate so they line up with the runway on landing?

    You have a starting point (Airport A) and finishing point (Airport B). If you fly between them, there's no guarantee that you'll end up on a path directly in front of the runway when you go to land. So I can imagine you'd need three navigation points, Airport A, the end of the runway at Airport B, and Turn Point C which a point in line... show more
    You have a starting point (Airport A) and finishing point (Airport B). If you fly between them, there's no guarantee that you'll end up on a path directly in front of the runway when you go to land. So I can imagine you'd need three navigation points, Airport A, the end of the runway at Airport B, and Turn Point C which a point in line with the runway some distance out. But here's the question - if you start turning the plane at C you'd have to compensate for the speed of the plane and the rate of turn otherwise you'd not line up. So how do pilots account for this? Always wondered ... thanks!
    Aircraft · 3 years ago
  • Does the 'pause' in global temperatures pose a problem for skeptics?

    After all, if the argument is that AGW is a leftist, liberal conspiracy, and scientists are manipulating the data, why wouldn't they change the data to remove the pause to avoid the problem in the first place?
    After all, if the argument is that AGW is a leftist, liberal conspiracy, and scientists are manipulating the data, why wouldn't they change the data to remove the pause to avoid the problem in the first place?
    12 answers · Global Warming · 4 years ago
  • Anyone else noticed unusually high 'thumbs up' across various boards?

    Up until recently, on many boards, top answers would get maybe 10 or 12 thumbs-up. All of a sudden we're seeing numbers in the 40s ... are 4 times as many people voting or is there a flaw that's suddenly being exploited. Yes, I know people can create multiple accounts and vote for their own answers. But the question is why we're only... show more
    Up until recently, on many boards, top answers would get maybe 10 or 12 thumbs-up. All of a sudden we're seeing numbers in the 40s ... are 4 times as many people voting or is there a flaw that's suddenly being exploited. Yes, I know people can create multiple accounts and vote for their own answers. But the question is why we're only seeing these high thumbs up now?
    7 answers · Yahoo Answers · 5 years ago
  • If there has been no warming for 16 years ...?

    then doesn't that pose problems for skeptics and deniers for the following reasons: 1. If you agree that there has been no rise in temperature in 16 years, then that implies you agree there was a temperature increase before that. So what 'natural factor' has suddenly stopped producing this warming? 2. Skeptics and deniers argue... show more
    then doesn't that pose problems for skeptics and deniers for the following reasons: 1. If you agree that there has been no rise in temperature in 16 years, then that implies you agree there was a temperature increase before that. So what 'natural factor' has suddenly stopped producing this warming? 2. Skeptics and deniers argue that scientists are fudging the data. So who took the data that shows there was no rise in 16 years. The scientists you guys said were lying? Only they're not. But they were. But not when you agreed with something. But before that ..?. 3. Deniers and skeptics pointed out that other planets were warming. So if other planets are warming and the earth has stopped warming, does that not disprove the sort of 'natural factor' you were speculating about? 4. So does temperature lead or lag CO2? If CO2 levels have risen and yet temperatures haven't according to this 16 year argument then which is it? How can CO2 levels rise if the temperatures didn't. Does that disprove that temperature leads CO2?
    8 answers · Global Warming · 6 years ago
  • What determines the magnitude of a contact force?

    Suppose we have a golf club striking a golf ball. According to Newton's third law the club will exert a contact force on the ball, and the ball will exert an equal an opposite force on the club. So the question is what determines the magnitude of that force? One way people describe it is in terms of the compression of the golf ball - it... show more
    Suppose we have a golf club striking a golf ball. According to Newton's third law the club will exert a contact force on the ball, and the ball will exert an equal an opposite force on the club. So the question is what determines the magnitude of that force? One way people describe it is in terms of the compression of the golf ball - it behaves like a spring. So, the way I've seen it discussed is that the club compresses the golf ball spring which means the spring exerts an equal and opposite force on the club. But this still doesn't explain the force that compresses the golf ball. Now I know that these collisions are described by impulse and momentum, but what's ACTUALLY happening during these collisions?
    2 answers · Physics · 7 years ago
  • Would nuclear bomb(s) really deflect an asteroid?

    Many of the effects we attribute to nuclear weapons (for example shockwaves and blasts) are due to the air surrounding the bomb. If you detonate an atomic bomb in space, then the only real effect is a massive release of energy in the form of EM waves. Would the radiation pressure caused by this really be enough to have any effect on an asteroid or... show more
    Many of the effects we attribute to nuclear weapons (for example shockwaves and blasts) are due to the air surrounding the bomb. If you detonate an atomic bomb in space, then the only real effect is a massive release of energy in the form of EM waves. Would the radiation pressure caused by this really be enough to have any effect on an asteroid or would we actually need millions of the things before we could deflect an asteroid by even a very small amount?
    2 answers · Physics · 7 years ago