• What causes long radio waves bend?

    5 answers · 3 days ago
  • Why doesn't time just stand still on the North and South Pole?

    If time zones are related to distance and degrees, and that you could walk a circle around all time zones from the poles, that would mean that the time at the equator goes slowest and at the poles there's no time at all. Now quantum theory suggests that if you negate gravity you negate time. So that would tell... show more
    If time zones are related to distance and degrees, and that you could walk a circle around all time zones from the poles, that would mean that the time at the equator goes slowest and at the poles there's no time at all. Now quantum theory suggests that if you negate gravity you negate time. So that would tell us gravity breaks down too. That would mean the Admundson station on the South Pole is a FAKE. Same with the Rocky Station up North.
    12 answers · 1 week ago
  • Why is time an important concept in physics, but past, present and future are not?

    Best answer: Past, present, and future are not absolute concepts. They depend on where you are and how fast you are moving. This is counterintuitive, but a result of special relativity.
    Best answer: Past, present, and future are not absolute concepts. They depend on where you are and how fast you are moving. This is counterintuitive, but a result of special relativity.
    6 answers · 4 days ago
  • So, the most powerful nuclear weapon can destroy how much?

    Best answer: No nuclear weapon could destroy an entire country (unless it is a tiny country like the Vatican). However the largest bomb ever built (of which there was only ever one) the Tsar Bomba could potentially destroy a small US state like New Jersey. The true devastation of nuclear weapons isn't so much the sheer... show more
    Best answer: No nuclear weapon could destroy an entire country (unless it is a tiny country like the Vatican). However the largest bomb ever built (of which there was only ever one) the Tsar Bomba could potentially destroy a small US state like New Jersey.

    The true devastation of nuclear weapons isn't so much the sheer physical force - it's the fact that they utterly destroy infrastructure, break down social structure and make a country almost ungovernable. How is a government going to keep control if the population are starving, the police and military are deserting in droves (trying to keep their families alive, or refusing to use lethal force against their friends and neighbours) there's extremely limited fuel, power and clean water and so on?

    You can look at the size of nuclear blast radii on https://nuclearsecrecy.com/nukemap/
    7 answers · 5 days ago
  • A 100lb box sits on an inclined surface of 30 degrees; what is the lowest coefficient of friction that will prevent the box from sliding?

    Best answer: μ = tan 30° = (√3)/3
    Best answer: μ = tan 30° = (√3)/3
    15 answers · 1 week ago
  • Given the following information; Current = 3.2 A; V = 110 V, what is the Resistance? 34.4 Ω 32.2 Ω 34.8 Ω 28.9 Ω?

    Best answer: Ohm's Law V = I*R and V/I = R = 110V/3.2A = 34.375 or about 34.4Ω
    Best answer: Ohm's Law V = I*R and V/I = R = 110V/3.2A = 34.375 or about 34.4Ω
    5 answers · 4 days ago
  • **URGENT**PHYSICS QUESTION (MOMENTUM, FRICTION, ICESKATING)?

    This winter, you and a friend decide to go ice skating on a frozen pond. However, when you are out on the ice, your blades lose their edge, and you trip and fall, eventually coming to rest in the center of the pond. Your friend watches helplessly from the shore; there is no friction between you and the ice.... show more
    This winter, you and a friend decide to go ice skating on a frozen pond. However, when you are out on the ice, your blades lose their edge, and you trip and fall, eventually coming to rest in the center of the pond. Your friend watches helplessly from the shore; there is no friction between you and the ice. Thankfully, you remembered to bring your backpack, which—of course!—only contains a physics textbook. Other than this and the typical winter clothes on your back, there is nothing else you have on your person to aid you. Without someone from the outside of the pond helping you (e.g. pulling you in with a rope, etc.), how can you escape your predicament and safely reach the shore of the pond?
    5 answers · 4 days ago
  • Is there anything harder to understand than General Relativity?

    Best answer: Well, GR is a quite hard theory, we can agree, but it's not CRAZY hard. It's pretty straightfarward in many aspects, it is more than 100yo and even the math behind it is more then a century old. Nowdays modern theories tend to use and develop much more complex math and physics. Complexity in these cases can... show more
    Best answer: Well, GR is a quite hard theory, we can agree, but it's not CRAZY hard. It's pretty straightfarward in many aspects, it is more than 100yo and even the math behind it is more then a century old.
    Nowdays modern theories tend to use and develop much more complex math and physics. Complexity in these cases can be hard to define, but the differentiable manifold geometry used in GR is really basic compared to certain other tools used in GUTs (for example).
    10 answers · 7 days ago
  • I Have A Physics Question Please Help Me?

    Describes how the particles vibrate in a transverse wave?
    Describes how the particles vibrate in a transverse wave?
    3 answers · 4 days ago
  • Science Question!?

    In science, confusion sometimes arises because a term used by scientists takes on a special meaning which conflicts with the use of the term in everyday life. For example, to physicists, speed and velocity have very particular meanings, and are not interchangeable, but in everyday conversation we freely interchange... show more
    In science, confusion sometimes arises because a term used by scientists takes on a special meaning which conflicts with the use of the term in everyday life. For example, to physicists, speed and velocity have very particular meanings, and are not interchangeable, but in everyday conversation we freely interchange the two terms. Suggest a way that this kind of problem could be avoided.
    11 answers · 1 week ago
  • How to calculate instataneous accelerations?

    Can we calculate instataneous acceleration using instataneous velocity? Because instataneous velocity and velocity aren t the same so that why I got confused.For example There is a question where displacement is a function of d=2t^2-4t+10.Calculate inst.Velocity and inst.Acceleration for t=4.
    Can we calculate instataneous acceleration using instataneous velocity? Because instataneous velocity and velocity aren t the same so that why I got confused.For example There is a question where displacement is a function of d=2t^2-4t+10.Calculate inst.Velocity and inst.Acceleration for t=4.
    5 answers · 4 days ago
  • Physics question?

    A plane is travelling at a constant velocity of 600km/h due east. At the same time a southerly wind is blowing at a constant velocity of 80km/h. What is the plane's final velocity?
    A plane is travelling at a constant velocity of 600km/h due east. At the same time a southerly wind is blowing at a constant velocity of 80km/h. What is the plane's final velocity?
    9 answers · 1 week ago
  • A Yo-Yo of mass m = 300 g has an axle of radius b = 1.5 cm and a spool of radius R = 4 cm. The Yo-Yo is placed upright on a table and the?

    A Yo-Yo of mass m = 300 g has an axle of radius b = 1.5 cm and a spool of radius R = 4 cm. The Yo-Yo is placed upright on a table and the?

    A Yo-Yo of mass m = 300 g has an axle of radius b = 1.5 cm and a spool of radius R = 4 cm. The Yo-Yo is placed upright on a table and the string is pulled with a horizontal force F = 8 N to the right as shown in the figure. If the Yo-Yo rolls without slipping,find its angular acceleration (𝐼𝑐𝑚=1/2𝑀𝑅^2)
    A Yo-Yo of mass m = 300 g has an axle of radius b = 1.5 cm and a spool of radius R = 4 cm. The Yo-Yo is placed upright on a table and the string is pulled with a horizontal force F = 8 N to the right as shown in the figure. If the Yo-Yo rolls without slipping,find its angular acceleration (𝐼𝑐𝑚=1/2𝑀𝑅^2)
    9 answers · 1 week ago
  • PHYSICS SATTELITE MOTION!! PLZ HELP!!?

    What is the apparent weight of an 82.5-kg astronaut 3800 km from the center of the earth's moon in a space vehicle moving at __________ toward the moon's surface? (Include magnitude and direction) a.) constant velocity of 125 m/s b.) accelerating toward the moon at 0.0750 m/s2 c.) accelerating toward the... show more
    What is the apparent weight of an 82.5-kg astronaut 3800 km from the center of the earth's moon in a space vehicle moving at __________ toward the moon's surface? (Include magnitude and direction) a.) constant velocity of 125 m/s b.) accelerating toward the moon at 0.0750 m/s2 c.) accelerating toward the moon at 3.25 m/s2
    8 answers · 1 week ago
  • What would happen if you split an atom?

    And why doesn't it happen when you're cutting something with scissors
    And why doesn't it happen when you're cutting something with scissors
    6 answers · 6 days ago
  • Why does the user Andrew Smith (if that IS even his real name!), think that time is meaningless at the poles?

    His logic is that because the sun doesn't go up or down at the poles time doesn't mean anything there. I guess the international research stations there would FALL APART if they employed that logic! What are they teaching at MIT!?!
    His logic is that because the sun doesn't go up or down at the poles time doesn't mean anything there. I guess the international research stations there would FALL APART if they employed that logic! What are they teaching at MIT!?!
    6 answers · 1 week ago
  • How to prepare for Physics with a bad teacher?

    Best answer: OK, this will be more work than you normally have to put in, but: Try to read material ahead of class. (Perhaps ask what topic is coming up.) Ask for extra explanation, or clarification of points, during class when what he said left you needing more. If you sorta get it, think it thru to see if it will begin to... show more
    Best answer: OK, this will be more work than you normally have to put in, but:
    Try to read material ahead of class. (Perhaps ask what topic is coming up.) Ask for extra explanation, or clarification of points, during class when what he said left you needing more. If you sorta get it, think it thru to see if it will begin to make sense. Come to us when all else fails. Search the topics on line.
    4 answers · 5 days ago
  • Physics Problems Momentum, Impulse, and Collisions?

    A 1.509 kg golf ball that is initially at rest is given a speed 29.39 m/s when a club strikes it. If the club and the are in contact for 0.0029 seconds, what average force (in kN) acts on the golf ball?
    A 1.509 kg golf ball that is initially at rest is given a speed 29.39 m/s when a club strikes it. If the club and the are in contact for 0.0029 seconds, what average force (in kN) acts on the golf ball?
    6 answers · 1 week ago
  • Who is the best current physicist?

    8 answers · 1 week ago