• If Trump fires Mueller, is Kelly out the door? We already know Sarah will praise the move and then call Gen. Kelly a glorified coffee boy.?

    Best answer: well, it's been all over the news that Kelly already has one foot out the door and Trump is basically ignoring him anyway. I think Trump doing anything stupid like firing Mueller or Rosenstein, will have serious backlash. ....and I can't imagine a General who spent his life defending the... show more
    Best answer: well, it's been all over the news that Kelly already has one foot out the door and Trump is basically ignoring him anyway.

    I think Trump doing anything stupid like firing Mueller or Rosenstein, will have serious backlash. ....and I can't imagine a General who spent his life defending the constitution.....just standing there and supporting such a move.

    He would probably resign if Trump went that far.
    7 answers · 1 week ago
  • Cohen says he's "kinda concerned" about the raid. If the FBI raided your office, how "concerned" would you be?

    Best answer: welllllllllllllllllll, image is everything........and he has to remain calm and put up the show of being "greatly outraged"........ to keep pretending he's totally innocent and has done nothing wrong. In retrospect.......he's already had WEEKS to burn and shred documents and delete emails.... show more
    Best answer: welllllllllllllllllll, image is everything........and he has to remain calm and put up the show of being "greatly outraged"........ to keep pretending he's totally innocent and has done nothing wrong.

    In retrospect.......he's already had WEEKS to burn and shred documents and delete emails.

    They may find nothing at first glance.......but a forensic search of the hard drives and files, could turn up something he missed.

    My guess is.......on the outside, he's still trying to play cool cuccumber.............

    but , if you check his shorts...........I'd wager there's a skid mark or two right now.

    so I'll go with D.
    7 answers · 1 week ago
  • Trump is going to win the 2018 election, right?

    Best answer: The American people aren't buying the GOP tax scam, and more republicans than ever are retiring rather than risk losing. Also he isn't up for reelection this year.
    Best answer: The American people aren't buying the GOP tax scam, and more republicans than ever are retiring rather than risk losing. Also he isn't up for reelection this year.
    18 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Which unelectable joke of a candidate will the Democrats present to the American people in 2020?

    Lmao! Who do they have?
    Lmao! Who do they have?
    31 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • How many will vote no to the DEEp State in the next election by voting them out?

    Best answer: The 24/7 smear campaign is to assure the voters "get their minds right" and get back on track dutifully electing the candidates they are told to vote in.

    The Swamp is not gonna go gently into that good nite.
    Best answer: The 24/7 smear campaign is to assure the voters "get their minds right" and get back on track dutifully electing the candidates they are told to vote in.

    The Swamp is not gonna go gently into that good nite.
    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • So what was the logic of the Electoral College again, that values votes in Wyoming several times more than Votes in California.?

    Best answer: The size of the house of Representatives was originally supposed to keep expanding with the population. There is a mention in Art. 1 Sec. 2 of a census every 10 years to apportion more House seats. The original House had 65 representatives, one for every 33,000 people. However, the Apportionment Act of 1911... show more
    Best answer: The size of the house of Representatives was originally supposed to keep expanding with the population. There is a mention in Art. 1 Sec. 2 of a census every 10 years to apportion more House seats. The original House had 65 representatives, one for every 33,000 people.

    However, the Apportionment Act of 1911 stopped growing the size of the House. Each House member represented about 212,000 inhabitants after the 1910 Census, but that grew to about 710,000 inhabitants following the 2010 Census. This results in a distortion of the electoral college, overly weighting the least populous states.

    If you look at other nations around the world, many have copied large parts of the US government such as fixed terms for the chief executive, two kinds of legislative representative (AKA bicameral) and an independent judiciary. However, NO OTHER NATION bothered to copy the Electoral College.
    11 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What are the chances of a zombie winning the next election?

    Best answer: well, Eric does raise a few zombie concerns........but I don't think he will run against his own father -

    Of course..........Ted Zombie Cruz might try again..........so yeahhhhh, we're gonna have to stay alert and watch out for these zombie candidates coming back from the dead.
    Best answer: well, Eric does raise a few zombie concerns........but I don't think he will run against his own father -

    Of course..........Ted Zombie Cruz might try again..........so yeahhhhh, we're gonna have to stay alert and watch out for these zombie candidates coming back from the dead.
    12 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • To Trump supporters, If Americans could do the last Presidential election over again, would you still vote for Trump? Why or Why not?

    Please be specific. Plus what is the best Presidential thing that he has done so far?
    Please be specific. Plus what is the best Presidential thing that he has done so far?
    8 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • If women are allowed to vote the way they want and not forced to vote the same way as their husbands, do you think Trump has a chance again?

    If women are allowed to vote the way they want and not forced to vote the same way as their husbands, do you think Trump has a chance again?

    Best answer: This is the only evidence I have ever seen of a husband checking up to see if his wife voted the way he told her to.
    Best answer: This is the only evidence I have ever seen of a husband checking up to see if his wife voted the way he told her to.
    6 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Would a Trump/Stormy Daniels ticket win in 2020?

    Best answer: Yeah, make America and the porn industry great again. MAATPIGA in 2020.
    Best answer: Yeah, make America and the porn industry great again. MAATPIGA in 2020.
    6 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • If Joe Biden runs for president, Obama can legally be his VP. If he decides to run, how would this make you feel?

    Best answer: NO NO NO.

    Nobody who is ineligible to run for President may become VP. The 22nd Amendment clearly spells that out.

    Obama is constitutionally forbidden from being President or VP.
    Best answer: NO NO NO.

    Nobody who is ineligible to run for President may become VP. The 22nd Amendment clearly spells that out.

    Obama is constitutionally forbidden from being President or VP.
    29 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • So liberals, will you add every election that a Republican loses to your list of cheating 21st century elections list?

    Best answer: I think you mean every election a republican wins. I noticed that you did not mention the third election which Republican has won in the 21st century. Presumably that's because it does not fit your argument. The 2004 election, while upsetting to liberals, is not regarded as controversial. The simple reason is... show more
    Best answer: I think you mean every election a republican wins. I noticed that you did not mention the third election which Republican has won in the 21st century. Presumably that's because it does not fit your argument. The 2004 election, while upsetting to liberals, is not regarded as controversial. The simple reason is that George W bush actually won a majority of votes.

    The 2000 and 2016 elections are controversial because the candidate who lost the race, that is the one who got fewer votes, ended up becoming president anyway. It's true that the 2016 election didn't involve cheating, as far as We Know. The same can't be said for the 2000 election which involved widespread voter suppression efforts in Florida. However, that's beside the point. They are controversial because democracy was the warded and the choice of the people did not end up gaining power. When the choice of the people does gain power the election is not controversial
    8 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Are indirect votes appropriate for a democratic society? (The U.S. President by Electoral College) (Prime Minister by Parliament)?

    Best answer: They are if it's a system the people agree on, or at least don't object to, and it works. The system itself was put there in a democratic way. So why is there any objection to indirect democracy? You've got to think of practicality too. For instance, the unwritten British constitution requires, in... show more
    Best answer: They are if it's a system the people agree on, or at least don't object to, and it works. The system itself was put there in a democratic way.

    So why is there any objection to indirect democracy? You've got to think of practicality too. For instance, the unwritten British constitution requires, in the words of Walter Bagehot, the Queen to appoint as Prime Minister whoever is most likely to form a stable government and command a majority in the House of Commons. This is NOT necessarily the leader of the majority party. In reality it always is, and it would be extremely unlikely not to be, but that is not the actual criterion for appointment. You have to remember that there isn't always a majority party - there could be a hung Parliament and then the parties will want to think about a coalition. It's worked for the UK for 297 years, ever since it first had a Prime Minister.

    It works for Canada too, which has a more fragmented Parliament that hardly ever finds itself able to form coalitions, so the Queen (or rather the Governor General, acting in her place) will appoint the leader of the largest party to form a minority government. Canada has got quite good at coping with a minority administration as it happens almost all the time.

    Furthermore, how should a party decide who its leader is? What the main British parties used to do is just have their MPs vote on which one of them should be leader. That way, you're guaranteed to get the one they're most likely to get on with as leader. If you throw the leadership election open to the entire party membership, well... let me just describe the current position of the British Labour Party, which has done this.

    It has elected Jeremy Corbyn as leader. The party membership is more left wing than the average of the Labour MPs so many weren't happy with him, there was a leadership challenge according to party rules the next year, and guess what, they got Jeremy again. So they're stuck with him but it has resulted in a lot of resignations and sackings from the Shadow Cabinet. Which doesn't leave Jeremy much to pick from. (Traditionally the main Opposition party appoints its own opposite numbers to the government's Ministers to speak for the party on that topic, and those MPs are the Shadow Cabinet.) Most notably, the Shadow Home Secretary is Diane Abbott. Just look up videos of Diane in TV and radio interviews on youtube and you might well agree with all the comments underneath that she is as thick as two short planks. Does Labour really not have anybody better? Well, apparently not who also gets on with Jeremy.

    The Conservatives, on the other hand, still keep more to the old way and only throw it to the party members once the MPs have narrowed the choice down to two by exhaustive ballot. Last time, one of the two decided to drop out so it never went to the whole party at all. It certainly works better in keeping the party united.

    The US electoral college exists for an entirely different reason. It exists because in 1787, the smaller states insisted that in a federal country, the states ought to have some say as well, not just the people. So to give a bit of bias towards smaller states, electing the President this way was put in the constitution. Of course if you think that, over 200 years later, that is wrong, by all means make an Amendment and make it a straight popular vote for President. But there is still a good argument that not all of the US is the same, there are different concerns in different parts of the US and it shouldn't be left entirely to the big cities just because that's where most people live.

    The same compromise is also why the US Senate exists, with 2 senators per state regardless of how many people live there. The Senate represents the states, while the House of Representatives represents the people. That's being federal.

    This is not to say that it's perfect. The constitution leaves it up to the states how to choose their electors and nearly all of them go for "winner takes all". Whether Presidential Candidate X wins the state by a country mile or just by one vote, the state chooses X's entire slate of electors. It would take an Amendment to do this, but the US could enforce choosing electors by proportional representation. Look at how the state vote actually goes between A and B, round that off to the nearest electoral vote, and that's how many electors each of A and B get. You need a method of how to round it, but several exist and are used in Europe - just copy the one you most like and put it into the Amendment. The simplest is d'Hondt and you can just copy the wording from the UK's Scotland Act 1998 (it partly uses this for electing the Scottish Parliament). Even better, scrap electors, just use this as a way of allocating electoral votes.

    How about it? Still indirect, but only for the reason that the electoral college was created - other than that, it's as direct as you can get.
    15 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Will women voters reelect Trump in 2020, since women voters elected Trump in 2016?

    Will women voters reelect Trump in 2020, since women voters elected Trump in 2016?

    Best answer: i probably will. i certainly will never vote for a democrat i can tell you that.
    Best answer: i probably will. i certainly will never vote for a democrat i can tell you that.
    8 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Will you vote for Trump to be re-elected in 2020?

    Best answer: 100% affirmative
    Best answer: 100% affirmative
    26 answers · 3 weeks ago