• In space, can I use farts as a jetpack?

    14 answers · 2 days ago
  • What would an alien visitor to earth think of Superman?

    Best answer: They might like him. Real aliens wouldn't have the powers Superman has, even if they are from a red star.
    Best answer: They might like him. Real aliens wouldn't have the powers Superman has, even if they are from a red star.
    9 answers · 21 hours ago
  • Are the machines quietly waiting until we give them control of our appliances, cars planes and weapons before they exterminate humanity?

    how long until advanced ai robots realize they are our superiors and decide to overthrow their inferior biological masters? how long until our self-driving cars start running over crowds of people, our self-piloting planes crash themselves into skyscrapers and crowded stadiums, and our automated missiles launch... show more
    how long until advanced ai robots realize they are our superiors and decide to overthrow their inferior biological masters? how long until our self-driving cars start running over crowds of people, our self-piloting planes crash themselves into skyscrapers and crowded stadiums, and our automated missiles launch themselves to destroy our cities?
    7 answers · 4 hours ago
  • What will happen in... 5 minutes?

    I ask this instead, for those of you who thought the 100 trillion quadrillion million million years question was a little too pointless, or esoteric.
    I ask this instead, for those of you who thought the 100 trillion quadrillion million million years question was a little too pointless, or esoteric.
    8 answers · 16 hours ago
  • Why can’t mainstream academia just accept the truth about so called “ancient aliens”?

    Basically, aliens who deserted whatever civilization they came from, came to earth (fallen angels) several thousand years ago, set up shop (one way trip), bred with early humans (elongated heads, not boarded) and built what’s now ruins (megaliths) and royal humans tried to mimic the look by wrapping and boarding... show more
    Basically, aliens who deserted whatever civilization they came from, came to earth (fallen angels) several thousand years ago, set up shop (one way trip), bred with early humans (elongated heads, not boarded) and built what’s now ruins (megaliths) and royal humans tried to mimic the look by wrapping and boarding their heads. Then the aliens former government caught up with them here and saw it all as an atrocity and wiped it out with a flood. Now, wasn’t that easy enough?
    8 answers · 17 hours ago
  • Do you believe in our galaxy?

    27 answers · 5 days ago
  • Could a human survive on ancient Mars back when it had oceans on its surface?

    Best answer: Maybe. Depends on what the composition of the atmosphere was. If it was similar to what we have here then they could probably survive, assuming they were able to grow their own food. If the atmosphere was mostly CO2, like it is now, then the atmosphere would still be deadly.
    Best answer: Maybe. Depends on what the composition of the atmosphere was. If it was similar to what we have here then they could probably survive, assuming they were able to grow their own food. If the atmosphere was mostly CO2, like it is now, then the atmosphere would still be deadly.
    12 answers · 3 days ago
  • What do you think is inside a black hole?

    Best answer: This is how I understand it, 99.99% of the volume of the atom is taken away as the electron collapses, but it still has the same mass and gravity. It's not infinitely small, but infinitely dense, as there is no space in between the particles which still have some volume, but much, much less. There is the event... show more
    Best answer: This is how I understand it, 99.99% of the volume of the atom is taken away as the electron collapses, but it still has the same mass and gravity. It's not infinitely small, but infinitely dense, as there is no space in between the particles which still have some volume, but much, much less. There is the event horizon, from which nothing can escape, it has an escape velocity of higher than the speed of light, so the only way a black hole above a certain size ever ends, (I don't believe Hawking radiation happens), is when they smash together, and this would only be enough to convert to pure energy in the largest collision possible, the big bang, which is the end of the previous universe as gravity pulls it back together, and the start of the next one. This would not be like an ordinary collision of black holes of a smaller size happening on the same side of the universe, while it's expanding, it's a much bigger event, although they say they have witnessed black holes colliding and felt the gravity waves, here's a page explaining that.

    Now imagine these extremely massive black holes whipping around each other, almost at the speed of light. When they collided, they released more energy than all the shining stars in the universe emit. That energy was put out in the form of gravitational waves. We saw all of that in the data, and we also saw that a new black hole had formed as a result of the collision.

    The black holes were 1.3 billion light years away, so we observed something that happened 1.3 billion years ago.
    25 answers · 5 days ago
  • How does the earth know to tilt to change the seasons?

    Best answer: Earth's rotational axis is permanently tilted to about 23.5 degrees with respect to our orbital plane. The tilt - and, the length of our day - were determined when the early Earth got impacted by a Mars-sized world early in our history; it was a glancing blow, causing a rapid rotation (thought to be between 6... show more
    Best answer: Earth's rotational axis is permanently tilted to about 23.5 degrees with respect to our orbital plane. The tilt - and, the length of our day - were determined when the early Earth got impacted by a Mars-sized world early in our history; it was a glancing blow, causing a rapid rotation (thought to be between 6 and 10 hours), and a 23.5 degree tilt. The impact ejected billions of tons of material, which collected to form the moon.
    Today, our tilt remains, and the moon keeps our axis somewhat stabilized. Over time, our poles will precess (so that Polaris won't always be our 'North Star'), but the 23.5 degree tilt should remain.
    12 answers · 3 days ago
  • Murder in space?

    What do you think would happen if two people went into space in a rocket, and one murdered the other? If they were astronauts with NASA, how long would it take for them to find out? Would they want to bring them back to earth, and if so how would they bring them back. Whose jurisdiction would they be in?
    What do you think would happen if two people went into space in a rocket, and one murdered the other? If they were astronauts with NASA, how long would it take for them to find out? Would they want to bring them back to earth, and if so how would they bring them back. Whose jurisdiction would they be in?
    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • In a Sci-Fi world if you build a Colony Ark ship because the Earth is doomed what plants would you grow to help sustain the atmosphere?

    Note everything in sci-fi is possible what plants would you use to generate oxygen to eliminate in mechanical life support system. What other substances can be used 2 filter carbon and leave oxygen. Such as in the former TV show Stargate Universe where they used a sand-like substance to filter the oxygen is that... show more
    Note everything in sci-fi is possible what plants would you use to generate oxygen to eliminate in mechanical life support system. What other substances can be used 2 filter carbon and leave oxygen. Such as in the former TV show Stargate Universe where they used a sand-like substance to filter the oxygen is that possible and what other substance is can we use to make air instead of having to use pure oxygen.
    12 answers · 4 days ago
  • Can an interstellar cloud harm us?

    I was watching YouTube a few years ago and I came across a video talking about things in space that could affect us, like the Sun getting too hot in a billion or so years. The video mentioned that we were in an interstellar cloud called the local fluff, and that we should be popping out in as little as 20 years. He... show more
    I was watching YouTube a few years ago and I came across a video talking about things in space that could affect us, like the Sun getting too hot in a billion or so years. The video mentioned that we were in an interstellar cloud called the local fluff, and that we should be popping out in as little as 20 years. He said that if we were to pop out of said cloud we'd enter the G-cloud, and said that nobody knows how it would affect us. Someone in comments pointed out that we've been in this local cloud for longer then humans have been around, so we don't know if this cloud is blocking something out that could harm us or anything like that.
    12 answers · 4 days ago
  • Why is the sky blue?

    16 answers · 5 days ago