• Help... Very depressing situation?

    Ok.. so i KNOW it was my mistake. But please tell me what to do now. I feel like I'll die out of sadness/my career is ruined I wasted 60 days of my summer vacation(after first year of University).. i didn't study or do anything. I feel really guilty, i feel like my career will get ruined because others... show more
    Ok.. so i KNOW it was my mistake. But please tell me what to do now. I feel like I'll die out of sadness/my career is ruined I wasted 60 days of my summer vacation(after first year of University).. i didn't study or do anything. I feel really guilty, i feel like my career will get ruined because others may have studied during these vacations. Please help :( what should i do? I'm feeling very scared to go to university again (for the third semester/start of 2nd year) >.<
    5 answers · 17 hours ago
  • Why do people say a person will be working for minimum wage all their life if they don't attend college?

    It seems very cliche when people say someone will be working at McDonald's all their life if they don't earn a degree. If everyone went to college, there would be no mail carriers, garbage collectors, secretaries, retail managers, warehouse employees, residential service workers, etc. I'm not putting... show more
    It seems very cliche when people say someone will be working at McDonald's all their life if they don't earn a degree. If everyone went to college, there would be no mail carriers, garbage collectors, secretaries, retail managers, warehouse employees, residential service workers, etc. I'm not putting down the idea of education; I'm just saying people are uneducated about the world of employment.
    16 answers · 1 day ago
  • Should I go to a 4-year university, or a community college, or does it not matter?

    My community college and 4-year university are about 1-2 miles apart from each other. I'm debating myself on whether I should got to the community college or the 4-year college. I will be living with my parents regardless of where I go so both options will be cheaper and I'm also eligible for a work-study... show more
    My community college and 4-year university are about 1-2 miles apart from each other. I'm debating myself on whether I should got to the community college or the 4-year college. I will be living with my parents regardless of where I go so both options will be cheaper and I'm also eligible for a work-study job at both places. My 4-year's yearly tuition is 10k. I have 12k in grants and scholarships for my 1st year. In 2 years, my 4-year will cost me 20k. This, of course, excludes textbook fees, parking fees, lab fees, etc. On the other hand, my community college's yearly tuition is 5k and I have between 6k-7k in grants for my 1st year. In 2 years, my community college will cost me 10k. This also excludes textbook fees, parking fees, etc. If I go to my 4-year, I will have less options for when I want to take my classes. I will end up having to take some classes in the mornings, some classes at noon, and some classes in the evenings. But I do have access to a variety of services like mock interviews, research opportunities, etc. If I go to my community college, then I will have more options for when I want to take my classes. I could take most of my classes in the mornings or take most of them in the afternoons or whatever (helps with consistency). The classes will be smaller so the professors will have more time to directly help me if I struggle. My ultimate goal is to become financially independent as soon as possible and move out of my parents home.
    8 answers · 3 hours ago
  • People that go to those very top schools in their region, like Harvard or Vanderbilt. are they really smart or parents just rich?

    Best answer: Both Harvard and Vanderbilt have "need-blind" admissions. They accept students only based on their academic performance, test scores and, to some extent, extracurricular activities. They do not look at how rich or poor applicants' families may be to determine whether they will be accepted. That... show more
    Best answer: Both Harvard and Vanderbilt have "need-blind" admissions. They accept students only based on their academic performance, test scores and, to some extent, extracurricular activities. They do not look at how rich or poor applicants' families may be to determine whether they will be accepted.

    That said, there is some preference to "legacy" admissions (one or both parents attended the university). Legacy applicants still have to qualify for admissions, but they might not be quite as stellar as would be expected for regular applicants. (perhaps, for example, a 3.85 unweighted GPA and a 1500 SAT for a legacy; rather than a 4.0 unweighted GPA and 1560 SAT, for a Harvard applicant). While there's no guarantee that legacies are any richer than non-legacies, a long history of university-educated people in the family does suggest that the family can at least afford the tuition.

    In any event, other top universities (for example, Tufts and George Washington University), have "need-aware" or "need-sensitive" admissions. They can't afford to potentially give every student financial aid, like Harvard can, so they accept enough students who can pay "full sticker price" to pave the way for those who need extensive financial aid. While it may seem like applicants that need no financial aid might have a bit of an edge over those that do, again, all the students admitted are fully qualified. These schools are very selective, so they're basically chosing rich students over middle-class students with identical GPAs and SAT scores. Instead of a coin toss, they choose the student who can pay full tuition, making more financial aid available for those who can't.

    In George W. Bush's day, the legacy preference and family finances would get applicants a lot farther than it does today. Yale's need-blind admission policy only started (I believe) in 1964 (so his was probably the last class that had need-aware admissions), and there were far fewer applicants in those days.

    Vanderbilt is very highly ranked. US News puts it as #14 (tied) in the U.S., equivalent to some Ivy League schools such as Brown and Cornell. Harvard is currently ranked as #2; it's nearly always ranked within the top three, alternating as #1 with Princeton, Yale, and sometimes Stanford.
    8 answers · 20 hours ago
  • Why do people choose majors that offer little to no career options?

    Best answer: These degrees aren't as "useless" as people make them out to be. It's really up to the person how they fare on the job market. Learning language, taking computer courses and networking along the way can compensate for those Philosophy and "lesbian dance therapy" majors. The snobbery... show more
    Best answer: These degrees aren't as "useless" as people make them out to be. It's really up to the person how they fare on the job market. Learning language, taking computer courses and networking along the way can compensate for those Philosophy and "lesbian dance therapy" majors. The snobbery displayed by the STEM crowd really is remarkable considering most of them cannot construct coherent sentences or read critically.

    I always recommend to college students that they study what they like, because studying something that may be "useful" won't be of interest to them and they'll fail. I do however encourage them to double major or minor in something a little more quantitative such as business, data science, economics, etc.
    10 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is my life over if I don't go to university?

    I can definitely see myself getting some education beyond high school, but am not sure if I'm university material. I took mostly general classes in high school and graduated with a 3.4 GPA. (Really if I would have taken advanced classes I probably would have been a C student.) I took some business electives and... show more
    I can definitely see myself getting some education beyond high school, but am not sure if I'm university material. I took mostly general classes in high school and graduated with a 3.4 GPA. (Really if I would have taken advanced classes I probably would have been a C student.) I took some business electives and found out I'm really good in accounting. I was looking at a two year program at a local community college and would like to get a part-time job as a bank teller as I go to build up my resume. However, my family says associate's degree in accounting are worthless....how true is this? Should I consider a different career path?
    15 answers · 3 days ago
  • Transferring to a 4 Year University?

    I’m transferring from a community college to a four year university. I just graduated from the community college this year so I have my Associates. I just got accepted to the private 4 year university I applied to. All the info they’ve given me so far point to me being Class of 2022. Wouldn’t I be class of 2020?... show more
    I’m transferring from a community college to a four year university. I just graduated from the community college this year so I have my Associates. I just got accepted to the private 4 year university I applied to. All the info they’ve given me so far point to me being Class of 2022. Wouldn’t I be class of 2020? I’m confused. I will ask the school ofcourse but I was wondering if anyone has any insight. I applied as a Transfer student specifically.
    6 answers · 1 day ago
  • I was rejected by my dream school but accepted to other schools with lower acceptance rate?

    Does anyone know why this could have happened?
    Does anyone know why this could have happened?
    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • Can I switch from an Associates to a Bachelor's degree?

    I want to do a Bachelor's degree instead, but I don't know if I could change it.
    I want to do a Bachelor's degree instead, but I don't know if I could change it.
    5 answers · 14 hours ago
  • Are professors notified at the beginning of a semester about students that have a disability (i.e. the inability to speak)?

    Best answer: If the student(s) has/have registered with student disability services and requested special accommodations, then yes. Otherwise, no.
    Best answer: If the student(s) has/have registered with student disability services and requested special accommodations, then yes. Otherwise, no.
    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • How to succeed in Entertainment Industry?

    I don t know if this is the right place to be asking this but how can I give myself the best chance to do well in the entertainment industry? I have some nice looks but i m only 15 and it feels like i m starting too late as most of the ones I look up to started acting and singing class very young. Plus, I don t... show more
    I don t know if this is the right place to be asking this but how can I give myself the best chance to do well in the entertainment industry? I have some nice looks but i m only 15 and it feels like i m starting too late as most of the ones I look up to started acting and singing class very young. Plus, I don t know if I should go to college or not because i m not trying to go into debt for a useless degree that s not necessary. I m starting to resent the ones who made it because it seems impossible and so far away. I want to live life doing something I love instead of slaving away for a company. What should I do?
    6 answers · 18 hours ago
  • How do I drop out of high school?

    Im always being bullied, I have no friends, and I even cry being there. Every day, fights happen, and we have stabbings. I don't feel safe anymore. I get terrible grades.
    Im always being bullied, I have no friends, and I even cry being there. Every day, fights happen, and we have stabbings. I don't feel safe anymore. I get terrible grades.
    12 answers · 6 days ago