• Why peasants in asia still use ox for farming ?
  • Would an organic diet help reduce cancer risk and other health problems?

    Best answer: Slightly. More important is the diet itself. Get the consumer report health newsletter. For example, they have been complaining about arsenic in rice for years. They recommend you eat rice no more than twice a week. They also list those foods where you should buy organic, as those are the ones most likely to have... show more
    Best answer: Slightly. More important is the diet itself.

    Get the consumer report health newsletter. For example, they have been complaining about arsenic in rice for years. They recommend you eat rice no more than twice a week. They also list those foods where you should buy organic, as those are the ones most likely to have the most benefits: Carrots and pears are two I remember.
    6 answers · 3 days ago
  • How would you react if you had goats but someone stole them?

    Best answer: 😡 angry😠
    Best answer: 😡 angry😠
    4 answers · 6 days ago
  • What happens when chickens on antibiotic-free farms get sick?

    Is the infection allowed to run it s course? Some chickens would probably die, but the strongest chickens would make it to the grocery store, meaning you would get the most power from the chickens. Still, it s kind of mean to let a bird suffer, and I think maybe illegal, so do they treat them with antibiotics and... show more
    Is the infection allowed to run it s course? Some chickens would probably die, but the strongest chickens would make it to the grocery store, meaning you would get the most power from the chickens. Still, it s kind of mean to let a bird suffer, and I think maybe illegal, so do they treat them with antibiotics and send them away?
    4 answers · 1 week ago
  • Vegans, how would you describe the life of a dairy cow?

    Best answer: just some ideas that you might want to include. For years and years just about every small family farm had a cow or two. I'm thinking back to the 19th century. On a lot of these farms, it was just like the pictures painted by authors like Wilder and Hardy. Milk was pretty much a thing that you got to have if... show more
    Best answer: just some ideas that you might want to include.
    For years and years just about every small family farm had a cow or two. I'm thinking back to the 19th century. On a lot of these farms, it was just like the pictures painted by authors like Wilder and Hardy. Milk was pretty much a thing that you got to have if you lived on a farm. and cows were well cared and treated humanely. Well at least till the family had too much milk production and took Ol' Bessy to the butcher.

    But technological developments allowed milk to be sold to urban dwellers. This was the birth of the dairy industry. It would be interesting to figure out what development was the tipping point. I vote for the glass bottle. Anyway by the turn of the century dairy farms were profitable and popping up near urban areas.

    Maybe as an interesting end note, NPR Just had an article about one of NYC's earliest diaries closing and becoming a plant milk plant.
    https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/201...

    Anyway, for most of the 20th century, dairy farms were still pretty small. I don't know the exact numbers but it was something like this: before World War II virtually all milk came from dairies that had less than 150 cows. Today almost all milk comes from dairies over 150 cows. Dairies with herds over 150 are what we imagine when we say factory farm.

    Some of the biggest changes have occurred in the last 10 years. Here in California, 90% of our milk comes from diaries of over 500 cows.

    Something else you might want to cover is the role of the dairy boards. In the 19th century, milk was not a staple or even considered safe or healthy. But the dairy boards went to work with advertising and lobbying in the beginning of the century. Today everyone thinks milk is healthy and even essential. Milk has become totally ubiquitous. It's relatively cheap because of subsidies. And ruthlessly marketed to children as part of the school lunch program and Happy Meals.

    This is a great article. but that first flyover is killer.
    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016...

    Oh, and be sure to review Cowspiracy, Food, inc. and the "milk documentary"
    11 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Can goats eat capsicum?

    4 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Why are liberals covering up the truth about Atrazine?

    Best answer: they want more endocrine disruptors in the food supply, so that more boys will become infertile feminized transgender he-she something-or-others, and more girls will have hairy chests and dress like hillary clinton in pantsuits.
    Best answer: they want more endocrine disruptors in the food supply, so that more boys will become infertile feminized transgender he-she something-or-others, and more girls will have hairy chests and dress like hillary clinton in pantsuits.
    4 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Can you feed dairy cows garlic?

    12 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • How much more does it cost to raise meat than to buy it?

    You must spend $100s on feed to raise 1 chicken when they cost $5 at the store ready to eat.
    You must spend $100s on feed to raise 1 chicken when they cost $5 at the store ready to eat.
    7 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Why doesn't Iceland grow all its food (including grains) in greenhouses?

    Best answer: Because even with lower-cost heat, it's still way more expensive to grow grains in a greenhouse compared to growing them outside in fields and shipping them. Iceland does grow some higher-value crops in greenhouses (i.e. fruits and vegetables), but for major commodities, it's not economic.
    Best answer: Because even with lower-cost heat, it's still way more expensive to grow grains in a greenhouse compared to growing them outside in fields and shipping them. Iceland does grow some higher-value crops in greenhouses (i.e. fruits and vegetables), but for major commodities, it's not economic.
    8 answers · 4 weeks ago
  • Is a lamb a baby sheep?

    11 answers · 1 month ago
  • What are good names for newborn goats?

    6 answers · 1 month ago
  • Best ways to up my rabbit business?

    Best answer: I would suggest providing ancillary services such as rabbit boarding, rabbit grooming, rabbit training, etc. You could also offer classes in rabbit care or training, have a web store for rabbit merchandise, etc.

    Retailing rabbits themselves? Not that big a market no how effective your advertising is.
    Best answer: I would suggest providing ancillary services such as rabbit boarding, rabbit grooming, rabbit training, etc. You could also offer classes in rabbit care or training, have a web store for rabbit merchandise, etc.

    Retailing rabbits themselves? Not that big a market no how effective your advertising is.
    4 answers · 1 month ago
  • Can I raise rabbits for slaughter agriculture?

    Best answer: You’ll need a license from the FDA to make sure that the animals are not treated poorly, they get proper housing, they’re entertained, etc.
    Best answer: You’ll need a license from the FDA to make sure that the animals are not treated poorly, they get proper housing, they’re entertained, etc.
    5 answers · 1 month ago
  • What is the purpose of marbling meat? I'm a vegetarian so I don't get it....?

    Best answer: Marbled meat refers to meat like beef that has fat running throughout it. This is good because when the fat cooks, it basically bastes the meat and make it juicy and flavorful.
    Best answer: Marbled meat refers to meat like beef that has fat running throughout it. This is good because when the fat cooks, it basically bastes the meat and make it juicy and flavorful.
    5 answers · 1 month ago