• Can a man join the united states military with one nostril?

    I have one nostril
    I have one nostril
    6 answers · 11 hours ago
  • Can soldiers participate in sports?

    Lets say a soldier whos 20 years old is an athlete and enjoys boxing for example. This soldier participates boxing to stay physically fit and because he enjoys the sport. If he shows up for work and has a broken nose, black eye, or swollen face, can he get in trouble for this? Would the chain of command do anything... show more
    Lets say a soldier whos 20 years old is an athlete and enjoys boxing for example. This soldier participates boxing to stay physically fit and because he enjoys the sport. If he shows up for work and has a broken nose, black eye, or swollen face, can he get in trouble for this? Would the chain of command do anything or not even care?
    16 answers · 2 days ago
  • Does a security clearance for the military check medical records?

    I recently enlisted and i’m just waiting for the security clearance, i just want to know if they will pull medical records.
    I recently enlisted and i’m just waiting for the security clearance, i just want to know if they will pull medical records.
    12 answers · 1 day ago
  • Question for army chaplains.?

    I am curious about something I am a SPC in the process of converting to Judaism and for that reason I am trying to keep kosher which I am putting in for seperats to purchase kosher food. But I am curious as to keep food kosher I am essentially required to have a kosher kitchen which is impossible to do living in... show more
    I am curious about something I am a SPC in the process of converting to Judaism and for that reason I am trying to keep kosher which I am putting in for seperats to purchase kosher food. But I am curious as to keep food kosher I am essentially required to have a kosher kitchen which is impossible to do living in the barracks is there a possibility of getting off post housing to allow for me to maintain a kosher kitchen? Thanks a ton.
    11 answers · 4 days ago
  • What changes should I expect from my soldier AND after marrying him after bootcamp?

    Best answer: Honestly, you have a better handle on the realities of being a military spouse than most folks your age. The overwhelming majority of first-term enlisted marriages do not survive that term of enlistment. Some do, but most don't. That's largely because of unrealistic expectations and the demands made on ANY... show more
    Best answer: Honestly, you have a better handle on the realities of being a military spouse than most folks your age. The overwhelming majority of first-term enlisted marriages do not survive that term of enlistment. Some do, but most don't. That's largely because of unrealistic expectations and the demands made on ANY new marriage.

    You're at least starting from realistic expectations. You know there will be long periods of separation; that you'll be largely independent much of the time, etc. That's good. You're not starting from pie-in-the-sky ideas of what married life will be.

    Rather than try and break down what to expect and not (and there are better resources for that than Y!A -- Family Readiness / Family Support will be your point of contact for specifics), I'll hit the big three things that cause problems.

    #1 -- First and foremost is money. Money can be a serious problem in any marriage; old or young. That is significantly compounded by being in the military. People have different ideas about spending and saving, how to prioritize money, who pays for what, where discretionary money comes from, etc., etc. That's highly personal so you two need to come to a consensus about how you'll handle money. There will be plenty of times where you'll need to be the one handling things at home while he's gone. Some folks are better at trusting their spouse than others about that. If he doesn't trust you with the finances or you don't trust him with them, this isn't going to work long-term. First-term enlistees don't make much so budgeting will be key. When one person makes more than the other (because you're going to need a job) that imbalance can be a source of friction.

    On that, I'll offer some insight from my own life and you can take it or leave it as you wish.

    To begin with, "equal" and "equitable" aren't the same thing. Equal is 50/50. Equitable is what is fair under a given set of circumstances. With that understanding, my wife and I looked at our total income to start. Of the total we make together, my income accounts for about 65% of that; hers about 35%. So I deposit 70% of my check into our joint account and 30% into my personal account. She deposits 40% of her check into the joint account and 60% into her personal account. That results in us each contributing slightly more than our fair share of our respective incomes to our joint account that pays for rent, groceries, bills, and other expenses that apply to both of us. And we each retain a fair share of our own money to do with as we wish. There's no fighting about "you spent $50 on crap now there's no money for groceries!" I have my money to spend, she has her money to spend, that amount we each have is proportional to our respective incomes, and we each contribute proportionally to our joint expenses. Joint money and personal money stay separate. We've been doing it that way for almost ten years now and it has worked wonderfully for us.

    #2 -- Family & social structure. You already understand many of the hardships you can expect. Again, mitigating that mostly comes down to talking about it first and agreeing on things before they become a problem. There are resources on base for Family Support. Use them.

    How will you handle leave to visit family? Do you want kids right away or in a few years (or not at all)? What about your job? Are you OK with quitting and finding a new job every time he gets orders? What about school? If you're in college now are you OK with trying to transfer when he gets new orders? Your life will be beholden to his. The military will not take your job or schooling into consideration when cutting his orders. Is he planning on one enlistment or does he want to try and make a career out of this? Be clear with each other about both his goals and yours and how you intend to meet those. "A dream written down with a date is a goal. A goal broken down into steps is a plan. A plan backed by action is a reality."

    #3 -- Your relationship. As you well know, you'll be spending significant periods of time apart. That's just plain hard on a relationship no matter who you are. Relationships need active attention. Physical affection matters and when you don't see someone for six months, your relationship can wither. Learning how to spend time together and time apart is important. It can be hard to make friends and establish a social circle. Make it a point to find other spouses you can talk to.

    Above all, you are a team and you should approach everything that way. When you play on a team, you do what you can to help your teammates succeed. You anticipate their needs and make a play to make that happen. That's how the whole team succeeds. No one person is responsible for everything and no one person makes the team succeed or fail. It's about how well the team plays together. That's true in marriage too. Just because something is "your" job or it's "his" responsibility doesn't make you not part of the team. Sometimes you need to be the one to make a play and sometimes he does. You support each other by recognizing that he needs you to be the best you that you can be. You need him to be the best him that he can be. You do that by helping each other grow as people. A better "me" and a better "you" make a better "us".

    Best wishes
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    12 answers · 3 days ago
  • What is deployment in Kuwait like?

    9 answers · 2 days ago
  • Does anyone know any sites or study tips to get a higher score on the ASVAB? (test)?

    Hi, I took the ASVAB through school and i got a low score of 38. I was wondering if anyone has any sites or study tips to help me in order to help to achieve a higher score. I want to go into the Air Force and I would love to get an AFSC with anything that involves health care or medicine, but I need a higher... show more
    Hi, I took the ASVAB through school and i got a low score of 38. I was wondering if anyone has any sites or study tips to help me in order to help to achieve a higher score. I want to go into the Air Force and I would love to get an AFSC with anything that involves health care or medicine, but I need a higher score. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
    9 answers · 2 days ago
  • I m trying to get a new eyewear prescription, will TRICARE cover it?

    I m looking to get a new pair of frames and contact lenses for personal use. I do intend to pay for the lenses themselves out of pocket, but was wondering if TRS would cover a prescription for me, and how I would approach doing so if it does.
    I m looking to get a new pair of frames and contact lenses for personal use. I do intend to pay for the lenses themselves out of pocket, but was wondering if TRS would cover a prescription for me, and how I would approach doing so if it does.
    8 answers · 5 days ago
  • Enlistment or College?

    I am 21 years old and currently have a 1.10 GPA, its bad. To top it off I cant afford to completely pay college on my own, decided to enlist as a combat medic to attain my track towards health administration and to satisfy my love of the armed forces as well as serve my country, but I'm conflicted, is it better... show more
    I am 21 years old and currently have a 1.10 GPA, its bad. To top it off I cant afford to completely pay college on my own, decided to enlist as a combat medic to attain my track towards health administration and to satisfy my love of the armed forces as well as serve my country, but I'm conflicted, is it better to finish college with my current GPA and financial trouble?
    11 answers · 4 days ago
  • Will a history of passing out while getting a shot and/or getting blood drawn disqualify someone from Military service?

    I have a history of passing out while getting stuck with a needle (and apparently it is pretty common, especially amongst males, according to my doctor) unless I am lying down while it happens. I was wondering, if I had a history of it, or during processing week, I pass out while getting my blood draw or while... show more
    I have a history of passing out while getting stuck with a needle (and apparently it is pretty common, especially amongst males, according to my doctor) unless I am lying down while it happens. I was wondering, if I had a history of it, or during processing week, I pass out while getting my blood draw or while getting my shots, would I be disqualified from service or discharged once at BCT during Processing week? I am not sure how much it helps, but the branch I am wanting to join is the Army.
    6 answers · 2 days ago
  • How should I contact my ex girlfriend of two years? I’m in the USMC?

    Best answer: Try this,......

    Hey, Wazzup? I will be home in 2 weeks and would like to see you, if that's possible? We could have dinner and chat.........I'd really like that. Let me know, thanks.
    Best answer: Try this,......

    Hey, Wazzup? I will be home in 2 weeks and would like to see you, if that's possible? We could have dinner and chat.........I'd really like that. Let me know, thanks.
    7 answers · 2 days ago
  • How do you dodge a military draft?

    4 answers · 13 mins ago
  • What ways can I increase my chance of becoming a pilot in the USAF?

    Best answer: To be a pilot you first need a bachelor's degree and a commission as an officer. You then apply for Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT). Every step of the way is competitive. The best option for a degree and commission is USAFA. Without an appointment to the Academy, your next best option is AFROTC. Your last... show more
    Best answer: To be a pilot you first need a bachelor's degree and a commission as an officer. You then apply for Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT). Every step of the way is competitive.

    The best option for a degree and commission is USAFA. Without an appointment to the Academy, your next best option is AFROTC. Your last and worst option is to finish your degree and apply to OCS. While there are more rated boards now than in the recent past, that is still the last place the USAF gets officers from.

    To be selected for UPT you must get a high enough rating on the Pilot Candidate Selection Method (PCSM). That rating is compiled from your AFOQT score, TBAS score, and flight hours. You get a rating from 1-99. How that rating is determined is considered test-sensitive information and the USAF does not publish how that is specifically calculated. The AFOQT is the exam that qualifies you for a commission. The TBAS is specific to aviation aptitude. You need at least a 50 on the combined Pilot/Nav line. Flight hours are flight hours.

    Most candidates do very well on the tests; in no small part because most of them have a STEM degree with an excellent GPA.

    The thing that mostly separates candidates is the number of flight hours you have. Very little separates the top applicants so if you have 100 more hours than the next person in line, that is huge. If you have no flight hours your chances of being selected drop drastically. You can start clocking hours as young as 16. So if you really want to be a pilot, find a flight school near you and start clocking hours ASAP. That is crucial. Of all of the things you can do to influence your chances of selection, time spent in a cockpit flying something is the most significant.

    Selection is called selection for a reason. Your whole person is taken into consideration. Meeting the minimum requirements doesn't get you anywhere. It is very competitive and your competition exceeds the minimum. In a group of pilot applicants the average is exceptional. So if you want to compete with that bunch you need to be exceptional too.
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    11 answers · 5 days ago