Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Computers & InternetInternetOther - Internet · 1 decade ago

What's the difference between torrent downloading and traditional p2p downloading?

Apart from the method by which you download, what are the differences? Which one's better?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
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    Torrent uses a different method for the download of files and is also more decentralized then a "traditional" peer to peer download service. It uses several different client programs, which connect to one (or more) trackers to get the information on which seeds or leechs have the parts of the file you want. The protocol can be much faster then traditional download methods, at much lower bandwidth cost to the "host." This makes torrent, in my view, the better system.

    However, when downloading copyrighted files (or any file) your ip address is able to be seen and logged by anyone else connected to the tracker, so there is very little privacy. If you are downloading copyrighted items you are doing so at your own risk. Now if you would rather download a linux distro then see it in a movie theatre, I think we can all understand.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Torrents use multiple computers to get pieces of each file, then combine them once they are downloaded. These can provide faster downloads, while increasing the potential of viruses, since you never know what computers are sending the various parts of the files.

    P2P is a direct connection between 2 computers where the files are transferred directly. With this method you generally know where the files are coming from, but are limited to the speed that the other computer can send data.

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  • 1 decade ago

    torrents have a longer lifespan but start off slower but once they get going they are much faster than p2p and you can get whole albums instead of single tracks

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