Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceHomework Help · 1 decade ago

A Midsummers Night Dream?

What is the significance of dreams in this play???

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    These resources have everything you need:

    A Midsummer Night's Dream

    Features: Scene-By-Scene Summary and Commentary, Plot Summary, Character Descriptions, Literary Analysis – Themes.

    http://www.bookrags.com/notes/mnd/

    http://www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/msnd/

    http://www.cliffsnotes.com/WileyCDA/LitNote/id-78....

    http://www.gradesaver.com/classicnotes/titles/mids...

    http://www.cummingsstudyguides.net/xMidsummer.html...

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  • 1 decade ago

    I read it but I don't really know.. don't know if this will help but spark notes says this:

    Dreams

    As the title suggests, dreams are an important theme in A Midsummer Night’s Dream; they are linked to the bizarre, magical mishaps in the forest. Hippolyta’s first words in the play evidence the prevalence of dreams (“Four days will quickly steep themselves in night, / Four nights will quickly dream away the time”), and various characters mention dreams throughout (I.i.7–8). The theme of dreaming recurs predominantly when characters attempt to explain bizarre events in which these characters are involved: “I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what / dream it was. Man is but an ass if he go about t’expound this dream,” Bottom says, unable to fathom the magical happenings that have affected him as anything but the result of slumber.

    Shakespeare is also interested in the actual workings of dreams, in how events occur without explanation, time loses its normal sense of flow, and the impossible occurs as a matter of course; he seeks to recreate this environment in the play through the intervention of the fairies in the magical forest. At the end of the play, Puck extends the idea of dreams to the audience members themselves, saying that, if they have been offended by the play, they should remember it as nothing more than a dream. This sense of illusion and gauzy fragility is crucial to the atmosphere of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, as it helps render the play a fantastical experience rather than a heavy drama.

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