redwhitch1952 asked in PetsCats · 1 decade ago

Does anyone out there have a pure white cat that is deaf and how do you deal with it????

Also does it have deep blue eyes ???

11 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best answer

    (Question)

    Why are blue-eyed, and odd-eyed white cats, sometimes deaf?

    (Answer)

    White is not a cat color. Cat colors are red and black. When accompanied by the delute gene, they are cream and blue. White is the abstance of color on a cat, and so are blue eyes, the abstance of color in the cat eyes.

    When an egg is fertilized in the womb of the mama cat, each kitten becomes one of four colors, red, black, cream or blue. Depending on what genes were given to it by mama and papa. Female kittens can be both colors sometimes, red and black, or cream and blue.

    While still in the womb, the color cells start the coloring process at the unbilical cord and start moving upward. There are a couple of genes that sometimes stop this process of coloring. They are called the White Gene, and the Spotting Gene.

    The Spotting Gene can stop the process at many different places on the kitten. Giving us all the different variations of the bi-color, and tri-color cats. But always, no matter how much white, and how much color a bi-color, or tri-color cat has. The white part is on the bottom of the kitty, and the colored part is on the top of the kitty. Because as the coloring process was taking place in the womb, starting at the umbilical cord and moving up to the top of the head, the coloring cells, when they reached a certain age in development, were being told by the Spotting Gene to turn white.

    The White Gene will stop the process of coloring the kitty almost entirely. Sometimes it will leave a small spot of color on the head called a kitten cap.

    Sometimes the White Gene stops the coloring process within the kittens eyes, causing one, or both of his eyes to be blue. This gives you the odd-eyed and blue-eyed white cats.

    Sometimes the white gene stops the coloring process within the kittens ears, causing one, or both of his ears to be deaf. This gives you the partially deaf, or deaf white kitten. A partially deaf, or deaf white kitten can have any color eyes, but for the most part, are odd-eyed and blue-eyed, because the same process that causes white cats to be white, sometimes causes blue eyes, and also sometimes causes deafness.

    For more reading on this subject go to "The Pigment Parade" by Lorraine Shelton

    Because the same gene that causes kittens to be born white, and odd-eyed or blue-eyed, also causes some to be born deaf. I'd like to expand a little on what it is like to live with a beautiful white blue-eyed DEAF kitten. It is exactally like living with a beautiful white blue-eyed hearing cat. The deaf cats won't mind you when you speak to them, but neither will the hearing cats! LOL They're cats remember!!!

    Deaf cats arn't safe when you let them outside, but neither are hearing cats, that's why I make everyone sign a contract saying they will keep the cat they bought from me indoors at all times.

    Deaf cats do seem to get along with children better. They can't hear the crying and noises they make, and just arn't as scared of them as hearing cats. I know all my kitties run and hide when my grandchildren come. You wouldn't know there was a cat in the house. But we had a little deaf girl here that use to run to them when they came, and played with them all the time they were here. They loved this little kitten very much and missed her when she went to her new home.

    I just want you to understand that genetically there is NO DIFFERENCE in a deaf white cat, than in a hearing white cat. Deafness in a pet is nothing as debilitating as deafness in a person. Cats don't have to go to school, and although hearing would be a great help in their hunting for food, deaf cats can find the food bowl just as easily as the hearing cats. Deafness is probably something you won't even think about after living the first few days with your kitten. In fact, you'll probably have to tell everyone your kitten is deaf, they won't even notice.

  • 1 decade ago

    White is not a cat color. Cat colors are red and black. When accompanied by the delute gene, they are cream and blue. White is the abstance of color on a cat, and so are blue eyes, the abstance of color in the cat eyes.

    When an egg is fertilized in the womb of the mama cat, each kitten becomes one of four colors, red, black, cream or blue. Depending on what genes were given to it by mama and papa. Female kittens can be both colors sometimes, red and black, or cream and blue.

    While still in the womb, the color cells start the coloring process at the unbilical cord and start moving upward. There are a couple of genes that sometimes stop this process of coloring. They are called the White Gene, and the Spotting Gene.

    The Spotting Gene can stop the process at many different places on the kitten. Giving us all the different variations of the bi-color, and tri-color cats. But always, no matter how much white, and how much color a bi-color, or tri-color cat has. The white part is on the bottom of the kitty, and the colored part is on the top of the kitty. Because as the coloring process was taking place in the womb, starting at the umbilical cord and moving up to the top of the head, the coloring cells, when they reached a certain age in development, were being told by the Spotting Gene to turn white.

    The White Gene will stop the process of coloring the kitty almost entirely. Sometimes it will leave a small spot of color on the head called a kitten cap.

    Sometimes the White Gene stops the coloring process within the kittens eyes, causing one, or both of his eyes to be blue. This gives you the odd-eyed and blue-eyed white cats.

    Sometimes the white gene stops the coloring process within the kittens ears, causing one, or both of his ears to be deaf. This gives you the partially deaf, or deaf white kitten. A partially deaf, or deaf white kitten can have any color eyes, but for the most part, are odd-eyed and blue-eyed, because the same process that causes white cats to be white, sometimes causes blue eyes, and also sometimes causes deafness.

    For more reading on this subject go to "The Pigment Parade" by Lorraine Shelton

    Because the same gene that causes kittens to be born white, and odd-eyed or blue-eyed, also causes some to be born deaf. I'd like to expand a little on what it is like to live with a beautiful white blue-eyed DEAF kitten. It is exactally like living with a beautiful white blue-eyed hearing cat. The deaf cats won't mind you when you speak to them, but neither will the hearing cats! LOL They're cats remember!!!

    Deaf cats arn't safe when you let them outside, but neither are hearing cats, that's why I make everyone sign a contract saying they will keep the cat they bought from me indoors at all times.

    Deaf cats do seem to get along with children better. They can't hear the crying and noises they make, and just arn't as scared of them as hearing cats. I know all my kitties run and hide when my grandchildren come. You wouldn't know there was a cat in the house. But we had a little deaf girl here that use to run to them when they came, and played with them all the time they were here. They loved this little kitten very much and missed her when she went to her new home.

    I just want you to understand that genetically there is NO DIFFERENCE in a deaf white cat, than in a hearing white cat. Deafness in a pet is nothing as debilitating as deafness in a person. Cats don't have to go to school, and although hearing would be a great help in their hunting for food, deaf cats can find the food bowl just as easily as the hearing cats. Deafness is probably something you won't even think about after living the first few days with your kitten. In fact, you'll probably have to tell everyone your kitten is deaf, they won't even notice.

    I found this info for you at www.angelfire.com/in/OaktownCattery/Whitecats.html

  • 1 decade ago

    typically white cats with blue eyes are more likely to be deaf. I would think that it's not that much of a change, my cats just plain don't listen to me.

  • 1 decade ago

    well my cat wasn't pure white, but he was deaf. if could just sort of pound (not bang) on the floor, or walls, they can feel the vibrations. thats how i always got my cat to come

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  • 1 decade ago

    My aunt had one. They used a laser pointer as a way of signalling the cat. It lived a long time. It was a very nice affectionate cat.

  • 1 decade ago

    i dont ahve a pure white cat...but i had a deaf dog who learned to read lips

  • 1 decade ago

    Yes, well I used to have one, we realized he was deaf when he tried to ride the vacuum cleaner. It was hard to find him sometimes, be he learned that then I motioned him to come that he should come to me. Just try using visual cues.

  • 1 decade ago

    No, But I know somebody who does.

    Always be in front of it and don't sneak up on it. Don't be rough and don't let other people be rough with it. Don't startle it and if it rests pick it up and cuddle it.

  • 1 decade ago

    I do, and its great fun sneaking up on him and poking him in the butt, he jumps like his feet are on fire!, your awful lucky to have one. bonus points cuz they're all white meat

  • Binky
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Teach it to sign

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