What to expect at a Buddhist temple?

I have never been to a buddhist temple before, but I am considering going on Sunday. It is called Vajradakini Buddhist Center for meditation and the website said it's free and beginers welcome. Do you have any advice?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    There are many varieties of Buddhist gatherings and centers. Some are almost entirely devoted to silent meditation and others are more like what most Westerners think of as worship services, with a sermon by a priest, monk, or nun, and announcements by a leader of the temple.

    Typical components of a Buddhist congregational gathering would be chanting, an incense offering, silent meditation, and a sermon or talk. It can last one or two hours.

    You should wear loose, comfortable, causal clothing to a meditation center. SOME (few) temples expect women to wear a dress or shirt and blouse. Call the center to find out about that.

    No head covering is required, nor are there any color restrictions for clothing.

    Most Buddhist temples will have an altar (with a statue of Buddha), side altars (with statues or pictures of the founder of the particular lineage of Buddhism followed by that temple), and either pews or meditation pillows/cushions.

    You should arrive early. Where you sit depends on the tradition of the temple. If there is a seated meditation, you'll be directed to a cushion. Ask, if you don't know.

    If you arrive after the service has begun, don't enter during meditation. Don't leave during meditation.

    It's entirely optional for you, as a visitor, to chant with the congregation, or to stand when the others do. There is NO part of the goings-on in which you may not participate.

    Do not take photos or videos, do not use a tape recorder, unless you have prior permission to do so.

    In some temples and meditation centers there may be an offertory box near the front of the temple. It is customary to contribute between $1.00 and $5.00.

    There may or may not be a reception after the service, in a separate area, at which light (and generally vegetarian) food may be served. This reception (if there is one) can last up to an hour. it is NOT considered impolite to not eat or drink. Some temples have a form of blessing said before or after eating or drinking. Take your cues from the others - if people seem to be waiting for something to happen before they eat or drink, do likewise; there will probably be a blessing said.

    It is FINE to not participate in rituals or meditations if you're uncomfortable about them. If you choose not to participate, you should sit quietly and still. In general, simply do NOT talk during service.

    Have a good time!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    people might talk about Buddhist writings or maybe do some meditation or mantras. It'll probably be pretty relaxed and the people there might just try and get to know you. I'm sure you'll find some interesting people there. Have fun!

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  • Teaim
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Yes, I have some simple and important advice.

    You don't need to try to impress the people there. Just go and be receptive.

    Also, remember that the monks are also just people. They are just as human, clumsy, lonely, etc, as you. they make mistakes and don't always say the right things.

    Also, remember that not all temples are the same.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Buddhists.

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  • 1 decade ago

    i am buddhist there are the buddhas in the temple. buddha is the person path from god , teaching us to reserve buddhist religion. usually buddhist have to visit the buddhas at the temple, every morning of monk's day. our religion is so peaceful everyone are very friendly to everyone and every religious. even though we are not those religions but we are treat them with respectful. the monk's day there is not on everyday

    Source(s): respectful from us buddhist!
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The one I went to they give a quick lesson on breathing and meditation.Then you sit on a cushion with others and meditate silently for awhile and they ding a bell, and you walk in a circle with them quietly for awhile, then they ding the bell again and you sit down and meditate again...they had lessons afterwards and tea if you wanted to stay. If you wanted to leave a donation, there was a box by the door , but no one mentioned that ever..only heard about it when someone they said came in and stole it and ran out...

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  • dd
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Like any other place of worship. Meditation at any place is fine.

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  • 1 decade ago

    If you are a Buddhist, you should expect nothing.

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  • 1 decade ago

    So many candles and so many figures of what's it.. animals?

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  • 1 decade ago

    well i am a buddist myself and i am thai, i guess u would see statues of buddas, monks, and u will pray and stuff like that. sometimes they can be partys too. be sure to respect the monks.

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