Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Pregnancy & ParentingNewborn & Baby · 1 decade ago

Red raspberry leaf tea?

Hi I was wondering if anyone ever tried red raspberry leaf tea to start labor? Does it work? And where would I be able to find it???????

37 weeks with baby #1

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favourite answer

    I drank it for 2 days, and went into labour on the 3rd. Every time I had a mug of it my back would start to ache. I found it in my local organic health food store. You're suppose to drink it 5 times a day, so I hope you're thirsty ;)

  • 1 decade ago

    I drank Raspberry tea throughout my pregnancy, just the Twinnings stuff you get in the supermarket. I like a hot drink, and didn't want to have too much caffeine so used that as an alternative.

    I don't know whether it induces labour, but I had my son in about 6 hours, which I'm told for a first baby is pretty quick.

    I often wonder whether it was because I had so much raspberry tea or whether it would have been that quick anyhow.

  • 4 years ago

    You cant find it at a grocery store.. I TRIED! lol.. go to GNC or a health food store. Raspberry Tea And Raspberry Leaf Tea is different, but some say it works the same :o) Good Luck

  • mw
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    I never tried it to start labor. My midwife had me on a ton of it the last few weeks, but not to induce labor. It just helps prepare your uterus for the delivery.

    I got mine from my midwife, but you can also get it at a health food or vitamin store.

    It's best to let your baby come when he is ready. The longer he stays in the oven, the better his lungs will work when he is born.

    Good luck on the last few weeks of your pregnancy!!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Mine didn't start my labour.

    I was told it helps you through labour by helping the Uterus contract and then after birth it is ment to help expel the placenta and help uterus to get back to normal shape.

    Also i was told it can speed up your labour.

    My labour was only 4.5hours.

    He was my first, although it was hard and fast it was better than my mum's labour with me that was 16hours.

    You can find the tea in a health food shop, and also maybe look in your local supermarket where the herbal tea section is.

  • 1 decade ago

    Yes, I take it daily, although it's not used to start labor. It tones the uterus and will help make labor more effective once labor does start. It's actually helping to decrease my Braxton Hicks contractions. I am 28 weeks. I bought mine online, both tea and pill form.

  • 1 decade ago

    Yes. Not sure if it really works though as I was due anyway a couple of days later. Try Health food stores.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    i did in the last 2wks of mine and my mid wife recommended it to me not sure it really worked,

    Try a health food store you should able to get it there, if not they could probably recommend some where

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Red Raspberry Leaf (RRL) can be found at any herbalists or most "nutrition" stores. However RRL will not start labour it is neither an emmenogogue or oxytocic herb.

    RRL is a great herb for pregnancy, it nourishes the uterus and helps prepare if for labour. It has been shown to prevent pre-term and post-term births.

    http://currantsandspice.fateback.com/tonics.html

    Raspberry leaf Rubus idaeus L. [Rosaceae]

    As a pregnancy tonic, raspberry leaf is widely known, as it has a long, well-documented history of use by pregnant women in China, Europe, and North America (Lieberman, 1995). Steeped in boiling water, the fresh or dried leaves make a nutritionally rich, flavourful tea that is said to nourish and tone the gravid uterus. In addition, "for centuries, women prone to miscarriage have been urged to drink raspberry leaf tea throughout their pregnancy to help them carry the baby to term" (Duke, 1997). This recommendation may reflect the role of nutrition in preventing complications such as miscarriage, postpartum hemorrhage, and premature or postdate labour (Cryns, 1995;Hudson, 1999;Parsons et al., 1999;Romm, 1997;Scott, 1998;Weed, 1986). The herb contains vitamins A, B complex, C, and E (Lipo, 1996;Weed, 1986) as well as calcium, iron, phosphorus, and potassium (Weed, 1986). Magnesium and manganese are also present in high levels (Pedersen, 1998;Belew, 1999) as are selenium, tin, and aluminum (Pedersen, 1998).

    The tannins, polypeptides, and flavonoids in raspberry leaves account for the herb's astringent, stimulating, and soothing properties (Bartram, 1998;Grieve, 1971;Hobbs and Keville, 1998). Of particular medicinal interest is an alkaloid isolated in 1941 and identified as fragarine, an inhibitor of uterine action(Whitehouse, 1941). In the popular literature, fragarine (also called fragine, fragrine, or fragerine) is described as toning the uterine and pelvic muscles, thereby facilitating an easy childbirth (Bartram, 1998;Hudson, 1999;Lieberman, 1995;Romm, 1997;Weed, 1986).

    The uterine stimulant and relaxant effects of raspberry leaf have been demonstrated in laboratory animals (Whitehouse, 1941); (Burn and Withell, 1941) but have not been studied in rigorous human trials. A recent retrospective study of raspberry leaf tea in childbearing women found a decreased likelihood of premature or overdue labour and of medical intervention in labour (Parsons et al., 1999). The herb is not implicated in any childbirth complications, and no evidence of long-term toxic or teratogenic effects has been found (McFarlin et al., 1999). Nevertheless, in view of its stimulant effect on the uterus, the tea is sometimes recommended only in the third trimester (Bartram, 1998;Grieve, 1971;Hobbs and Keville, 1998); Whitehouse, 1941; (Balch and Balch, 1990;Burn and Withell, 1941;McFarlin et al., 1999;Ody, 1999), although use throughout pregnancy, often with progressively increasing dosage, has been advocated by herbalists and midwives (Gardner, 1987;Lieberman, 1995;Romm, 1997). Brinker (1998) lists raspberry leaf as contraindicated in women who have a history of very fast labours.

    http://konzababy.tripod.com/RRL.htm

    "Red Raspberry leaf does not start labor or promote contractions.It is NOT an emmenagogue or oxytocic herb. What it does is help strengthen the pelvic and uterine muscles so that once labor does start the muscles will be more efficient."

    http://www.birth.com.au/class.asp?class=67&page=25

    The first study is a retrospective observational study of 108 mothers over a 6 month period (Jan-July 1998). Of this group, 57 women (52.8%) consumed raspberry leaf products (tea or tablets) during their pregnancy and 51 women (47.2%) did not (being the control group). Most of the women taking raspberry leaf started doing so at some stage between 28 and 34 weeks of the pregnancy, but a few started as early as 8 weeks and others as late as 39 weeks. The study could not identify any side effects from taking raspberry leaf and it indicated that the herb may help prevent women having a premature or overdue baby and may be less likely to need an artificial rupture of their membranes (breaking the waters by the caregiver). They were also less likely to require a caesarean section, forceps or vacuum birth than the women in the control group. (Parsons 1999)

    The second study was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of 192 first time mothers (average age 28.5 years) who had their babies between May 1999 and February 2000. One group of women took raspberry leaf tablets (1, 200mg twice per day) from 32 weeks of their pregnancy until labour started and the control group took a placebo. There were no identified side effects for either mother or baby, but contrary to popular belief, it did not shorten the 1st stage of labour. The only clinically significant findings were a shortening of the 2nd stage of labour (by about 10 minutes), a lower rate of forceps deliveries (19.3% vs. 30.4%) and less chance of Caesarean (62.4% vs. 50.6%) for the women who took raspberry leaf. Both groups of women experienced similar occurrences of nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea and constipation. (Simpson et al. 2001)

    http://www.birth.com.au/class.asp?class=67&page=25

    Researchers in Australia analyzed the safety and effectiveness of raspberry leaf tablets on the duration of labor. In the study of pregnant women, they could not identify any adverse effects for either the mothers or their babies. They did find that women who ingested raspberry leaf might be less likely to receive a Cesarean section, and observed a 35 percent reduction in forceps deliveries for women using raspberry leaf, compared to other women.

    In another double-blind, randomized trial, the use of raspberry leaf tablets by women in their last month of pregnancy was associated with a significant shortening of stage-two labor, but not of stage one.

    Researchers in Australia analyzed the safety and effectiveness of raspberry leaf tablets on the duration of labor. In the study of pregnant women, they could not identify any adverse effects for either the mothers or their babies. They did find that women who ingested raspberry leaf might be less likely to receive a Cesarean section, and observed a 35 percent reduction in forceps deliveries for women using raspberry leaf, compared to other women.

    In another double-blind, randomized trial, the use of raspberry leaf tablets by women in their last month of pregnancy was associated with a significant shortening of stage-two labor, but not of stage one.

    There has been research on the effects of raspberry leaf extracts on animals and on women in the first week after birth (Burn & Withell, 1941; Whitehouse, 1941). Raspberry leaf was found to cause a relaxant effect on the uterus. It was believed that this relaxant effect caused the uterine contractions of labour to become better coordinated and more efficient, thus shortening the length of labour. It is also commonly assumed that women who take raspberry leaf throughout labour will have an improved second and third stage of labour. Consequently there is supposed to be a reduced risk of bleeding after birth.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_raspberry_leaf

    The leaves contain high concentrations of several vitamins and minerals because of the plant's secondary compounds. As a result, it is used as an aid for pregnancy and delivery.

    Vitamin C and vitamin E are present in large amounts as well as Vitamin A and some B Complex. Increased Vitamin A intake in the form of the carotenoids of red raspberry leaf can aid the women’s immune system as well as facilitate healthy skin and bone development for the baby. Vitamin E serves to promote better circulation in the mother who is dramatically increasing her blood volume during pregnancy. The Red raspberry leaf also contains many essential minerals such as phosphorus, potassium, and an easily assimilated form of calcium. An increased availability of calcium is necessary in controlling nerve response to pain during childbirth and in aiding bone development in the fetus. It also contains fragrine, an alkaloid which help tone the muscles of the pelvic region including the uterus. This allows the uterus to contract more powerfully and effectively during labor. Also, many midwives report that it aids in focusing the pre-labor contractions that help a woman’s uterus to prepare for delivery. The high vitamin and mineral content help replace those lost via blood loss during delivery. Also, the alkaloids will continue toning the uterus as it returns to its usual size. In some women, the high mineral content may even help their milk to come in.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_raspberry_leaf

    http://www.americanpregnancy.org/pregnancyhealth/h...

    Medical studies have shown that red raspberry leaf can be consumed safely during pregnancy and can decrease the length of labor and decrease the number of interventions used such as AROM, assisted delivery and cesarean delivery.1 Red raspberry leaf also seems to help prevent pregnancies from pre or post term gestation (delivering too early or too late).

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