Is the term "black person" considered offensive?

So many (white) people are so careful to say african american. I am in the south (which means constant racial tension) and white, but have been the minority many times in my life. I am not offended when people say I am white (i actually prefer it to caucasian, which I don't even think I can spell).

***This is If I am describing a person that is black, which happens often since I am a medical professional. I don't just walk around telling people that they are black. i am not a dumbass

Update:

Sweet, is that an agree or disagree?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I am Black, and I don't care what someone else calls me as long as it is not meant to offend me. People do get offended for many reasons, not just by calling them colors. Black, clearly states the racial name of of the Black people, and I don't think that is an offense. Some people rather be called African-American, simply because they want to show their American side and at the same time show some respect to their African ancestries.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    When you have a chance, open a copy of the 2nd book in THE HARDY BOYS series, "The House on the Cliff," by Franklin W. Dixon. It's a story about two boy detectives solving a crime. On page 77, Frank Hardy observes something suspicious and declares that he smells "a n!gger in the woodpile."

    The author (whose real name was Leslie MacFarlane) wasn't trying to be offensive. Back in those days (1927), the N-word, the one we get reported and banned for saying now, was just one more word in common use. That was how everybody referred to Blacks, including the Blacks themselves.

    You can't have both Freedom of Speech and Special Protections Against Offense. Your society must choose between them. It's one or the other, but never both. When you grant a minority special protection from being offended, its members waste no time in finding just as many ways to be offended as possible. Declaring that they are offended has just become their road to political power and economic gains. Everyone else, meanwhile, still has to work for those things.

    That's why, over the years, we've seen one word after another pass from being accepted to being vilified. The N-Word was succeeded by the more recent n-word, which we could still say on Yahoo Answers until quite recently. Not "N-ger," but "N-gro." Then we got "colored people."

    After that, it was that N-gro word again. Blacks were proud of the N-gro word for many years; now they don't want to hear it. Then it was "Blacks." Then it was "Afro-American," and now it's "African-American." We've had a parade of new words, one after another. You had to stay in fashion, or those in authority would censor you or threaten you in some way.

    These constant changes serve to keep White people hoppin', always uncertain, always on the defensive. That is what they're supposed to do.

    You can't have both free speech and special protections from offense. Our Founding Fathers considered the matter and deemed free speech to be the more important. Of course, they were White guys.

    "If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen." - Samuel Adams, speech at the Philadelphia State House, August 1, 1776

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  • 1 decade ago

    No, not at all. I prefer 'black person' a million times over "african american". My thing is that it should all be equal, if you call black people 'african' america, then the reciprocal term for white people would be 'european american'. Both came here on boats from other continents. But somehow black people are african americans, and white people are simply....american?....I am not at all ashamed of my ancestors being slaves (in theory) it is infact something to be proud of because I am living proof of their success. However, I have NEVER been to Africa, my parents were not from Africa, and I don't have any plans of going to Africa anytime soon. Any job application will show you that their is STILL a bit of unequality, because black people are considered 'african american, but white people are not considered 'european american' even though they indeed are. I put the term 'african american' in the same cultural trash can as 'colored' and 'knee-gro'. It doesn't evoke the same negative emotion as other 'terms', but I don't care for it at all, because it seems to be yet another manisfestation of seperation, inequality and lack of reconition for a people who 'literally' built this country on their backs.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Emily, I am offended by the term "white". It reminds me of a time when things were segregated. If we can say African American then why can't we say Euro American?

    I hope you continue to use the term "African American" and not all those with that title are black at all.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I personally would like a person to call me by my name. I do not see anything wrong with using the term: “Black Person”, but there are people who would rather be called African American instead of Black. It is pretty much up to the individual you are talking to…

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Calling someone a white or black person is just fine. Good for you that you are not falling victim to racism and ignorance. You do realize alot that do fall victim arent educated and you are so intelligent and open minded so bravo. So you can do your individual part to correct those that live within a small circle of people.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I hate being called African American because I was not born in Africa and because I do not know the cultures of African i.e. their traditions and so forth. Furthermore, I love being called black American because I believe that the term truly express who I am.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    First I would like to say don't worry about it, but you sound like a really nice person and remember you can't please everyone, I don't like the term black so much but don't mind, plus alot of people consider themselves that. Your white and am black and thats fine even though we don't look the color were called...odd.

    But I like sweets answer I do consider myself American the African part came from..idk....I never went there nor do I know what part I came from but I understand thats part of me but am America.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I prefer to be called Black, actually. Many people like to call me African American, but the majority of my ancestors came from the Caribbean, so I'm actually Caribbean American.

    So Black works just fine.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I am mixed...mainly black/native american...I follow Langston Hughes' philosophy and say that I am brown

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