Where does the line 'first in best dressed' originate from?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favourite answer

    First in, best dressed.

    I believe it originated from an old Latin proverb...

    `prior tempore, prior jure.'

    [First in time, first by right.]

    [First come, first served.]

    @`Webster's New Universal Unabridged Dictionary' Deluxe Second Edition. 1964 Simon & Schuster

    There are many proverbial forms of the thought since it's Latin origin:

    He who comes first, eats first.

    - Eike von Repkow (fl. c. 1220)

    @`Sachsenspiegel' (1219-1233)

    Cited in `Bartlett's Familiar Quotations' 16th Edition

    Whoso that first to mille comth, first grynt.

    - Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1342-1400)

    @(c. 1390) `Wife of Bath's Prologue'

    Cited in `The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Proverbs' 2nd Ed.

    first come first serued.

    - Henry Brinklow

    @(1548) `Complaint of Roderick Mors'

    Cited in `Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable' 1981

    There are many ethnic versions of this proverb as well.

    "First Come, best dressed" seems to have originated in Australia, maybe in the 19th century.

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  • 3 years ago

    First Come Best Dressed

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  • 5 years ago

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    RE:

    Where does the line 'first in best dressed' originate from?

    Source(s): line 39 dressed 39 originate from: https://tr.im/eoDXr
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  • pals
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    First In Best Dressed

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  • Gay
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    When did men start wearing dull 'dark' suits/attire, and ties (nooses!), for their weddings? Probably in the damn 'Victorian' era, the 'Industrial Revolution/De-volution' era (the beginning industrialization of our minds!). It certainly wasn't the case in the European Renaissance, when men wore bright colors, and even ruffles and lace!)

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