Why isn't Jehovah in the Koran?

The Qur’ān tells of someone “who was deeply versed in the Scriptures.” (Al-Naml [27]:40, NJD) In explaining this verse, a commentary known as Tafsīr Al-Jalālayn says: “It was Asaph the son of Berechiah. He was a righteous man. He knew God’s greatest name, and whenever he called on it, he was answered.” But who is... show more The Qur’ān tells of someone “who was deeply versed in the Scriptures.” (Al-Naml [27]:40, NJD) In explaining this verse, a commentary known as Tafsīr Al-Jalālayn says: “It was Asaph the son of Berechiah. He was a righteous man. He knew God’s greatest name, and whenever he called on it, he was answered.” But who is this Asaph the son of Berechiah who knew the greatest name of God? The Qur’ān very often advises turning back to God’s ancient books in order to obtain the answers. (See Yūnus [10]:94; Al-Naḥl [16]:43; Al-Anbiyā’ [21]:7.) These tell us that Asaph the son of Berechiah was the one who by inspiration wrote Psalm 83. (1 Chronicles 15:17; Psalm 83, superscription) Verse 18 of this psalm says: “That people may know that you, whose name is Jehovah, you alone are the Most High over all the earth.” We thereby see that “Jehovah” is the greatest name.

Asaph was not the only one who knew this great name. All the prophets whom God had inspired in the past to write the Holy Scriptures knew that name and used it. It also constitutes a part of many proper nouns, some of which we find in the Qur’ān. The name of the prophet John (Yaḥyā) means “Jehovah Has Been Gracious”; that of the prophet Elijah (Ilyās) means “My God Is Jehovah”; the name Zechariah means “Jehovah Has Remembered.”
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