? asked in PetsDogs · 10 years ago

German Shepherd quesiton?

i have a 1 year old GSD and wanted to know when they are no longer puppies. She still chews anything left in sight and digs lots of holes. (she gets more than enough exersie and we have another dog to play with). Also she has started to become very protective of her ball and does nto let any other dog near it..how do i cure this? i do not want her to become an agressive dog

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  • Anonymous
    10 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    at 1 yr old, your gsd is technically an adult now, and should already be spayed especially if living with another dog (male or female? neutered or not?) so i am presuming she is. what training has she received? its time for her to be enrolled into an obedience class with only you handling her, and you and her would both benefit from it, and enjoy it hugely at the same time.

    i always become concerned when i hear of gsd's kept as pets and beginning to show signs of aggression and over possessiveness at such a young age, and usually the issue is that they have not received any adequate training or handling, which is of the utmost importance to this very intelligent breed of dog.

    i have seen gsd's bred from champion bloodlines being euthanized for exactly this issue - when over possession and over protectiveness for which they are famous gets out of hand and they turn vicious - due to lack of understanding of the breed and poor inadequate handling on the part of the owners. don't fall in to this same trap - the more you learn about her now - the better dog she will become for you.

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  • All dogs mature at a different rate. Breeds have different ages they mature for instance a miniature Yorkshire terrier would mature at about 10 months. By maturity I mean both physical and social maturity.

    A Great Dane on the other hand would not reach full maturity until about 27 months. German Shepherds about 17 months. It is important to allow full maturity before spaying and castration.

    Dogs stop being puppies irrespective of size and breed at about 24 weeks when they move on to become juniors. Your dog can come into season from about seven months onwards and can start protecting objects if they are having a phantom pregnancy or their natural tendency to guard starts to kick in.

    Your dog is also just reached the teenager stage, to calculate a dogs age in human terms is not as many believe 1 human year to every 7 dog years.. It is 15 for the first year 10 for the second and 5 for every year thereafter. This is still a approximation as you would need a proper chart showing all the breeds to work it out exactly. But it is far better approximation the the old 7 year belief.

    Remove the ball if she starts to become aggressive over it.

    Source(s): I am a Dog Behaviourist and Obedience Trainer
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  • 10 years ago

    Having lived with multiple dogs at a time, one dog protecting a specific toy is no problem and the other dogs will leave him alone with it. Chewing behavior should start slowing down about now, as should the digging also. GSDs are extremely bright dogs and really need mental simulation as much as physical. Play games with her to keep her mind active and this should wear her out even more than walks. Do a google search for "dog games", there are many of them out there. The more you keep her mind occupied the less time she will have for digging and chewing.

    Here's a wonderful GSD site made by one of the top GSD breeders that you might enjoy;

    http://www.leerburg.com

    Source(s): Breeder
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  • 10 years ago

    Dogs are still classed as puppies until, I believe their 2nd birthday. There are several things you can do to help with her naughty behaviour.

    1 - Depending on what she is chewing, either make sure nothing is left on the floor, or if it's furniture, etc. spray everything with a fine mist of water, then use a brush & dust with pepper. She will hate the taste & is less expensive than the anti chew sprays you can buy.

    2 - If she's chewing while you are out, leave her in one room only, preferably where she can do the least damage, or a crate. Again, spray every thing in site as above. Leave her with her bed & something that smells of you (an old jumper etc.) that you no longer want, but have worn.

    3 - Get a squirty bottle filled with 95% water/5% vinegar. Again, as with the pepper, it won't do her any harm, but she will hate the smell. As soon as you see her chewing/digging squirt her with the spray & state firmly, but calmly NO. The smell will distract her while you correct her.

    4 - Whenever she does something right, like leaving something alone that you have left out, reward her with a treat & a fuss.

    5 - Exercise her before you leave her. Sounds impossible? Get a bike/skates & run her flat out round the block a few times until she can't run any more. If she's running flat out, shouldn't take any more than about 10 mins. She'll get used to running along side you very quickly & will really enjoy it. Once you get her home shut her in the room/crate with the blanket & something of yours & then just leave. She'll be so tired, she'll sleep till you come home.

    All the above worked on our 10mth boxer/staff cross, who chewed everything & anything, especially while we were out. She dug that many holes am sure she was half way to Australia & my plants were strewn all over the garden. The spray stopped the digging, the pepper & exercise solution stopped the chewing. We also have a 3yr staff who never chewed/dug up anything, but it made no difference to Chloe's behaviour, until we tried the above.

    Good luck.

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  • 10 years ago

    Start to mentally stimulate her. I have an 8 month old GSD, and he would chew everything in sight, he even went as far as to chew my saddle for my horse =O. But then I started his basic training, try teaching her to sit, stay, etc. GSD if not challenged in all way get so bored that they become destructive. Her aggressiveness could be due to that lack of mental stimulation. If not then i would consider researching it on the Internet and if that doesn't help, seek a trainer. But if the trainer wants you to use a choke chain get out there asap a dog never needs a choke chain hope this helps. =D

    Source(s): Owner of two German Shepherd Dogs
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  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    Officially they are out of puppy by 1 year. Mentally, and in some cases/breeds, physically, maturity can take some considerable time beyond 1 year.

    I'd suggest this behaviour means you need to vastly up her exercise. Dogs are only destructive, and dig, when they are basically bored out of their minds and if she's alone long enough to be digging holes, she's not being supervised enough. If she's defending her toys, take them away - especially if you have other dogs and if they are being left alone together.

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  • pruin1
    Lv 4
    10 years ago

    Its not so much a puppy issue at this point as a training issue. As she gets bigger this will get harder and harder to deal with. She doesnt magically become trained when she becomes an adult dog. Contact a trainer and learn how to resolve the issue asap.

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  • 10 years ago

    You need to seek professional guidance to change this type of behavior. Seek out a club or trainer in your area. Sign up for obedience classes.

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  • 10 years ago

    All dogs are considered to be adults and not puppies at the age of one year old, as this is when you switch them to adult food and they stop growing. I wonder, has your dog been spayed? If she hasn't, it sounds like she might be going through a false pregnancy - the toy protecting is a classic symptom of that. If she has just had or gone into season, I would definitely say that she is having a false pregnancy and I would advise taking her to the vet. If she has been spayed, then it is impossible that she is going through a false pregnancy, but I would take her to the vet anyway, just to get her checked over.

    I hope this helps!

    - Amber Faerie

    Source(s): Daughter of a veterinary surgeon
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