Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentLaw & Ethics · 10 years ago

can a landlord enter your home by posting a notice on your door 24 hours in advance?

I didn't not receive this "so called notice" but my landlord said that they posted it on my door (some jerk probally took it of im in an apartment) they entered my home when i was sleeping and woke my baby up who was up all night teething and when i said wtf? and tried to get them to leave they said no we have a right to be here and we gave you notice, when i had explained to them i never recived this notice they said to bad.... can i fight them on this in anyway?

Update:

sorry i didnt add more detail. they said the notice said between 9 am and 5 pm they showed up at 11 30 am. Im in Alberta Canada and it was aparently for a safety inspection.. but how are they aloud to just show up between a time like that.. i was just putting my little girl down for a nap and they woke her up! (a very important one because i was starting her on solids today and i have a set schedual for it)

7 Answers

Relevance
  • Sharon
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    You do, with 24 hours written notice, have a contractual obligation to let them come in. However, I'd suggest the appointments have to be at a mutually agreeable time, within normal working hours usually. And it's a mute point re whether you gave notice, or they did. And under what circumstances. Frankly we were given, unexpectedly and out of the blue, notice of an intention to sell the property we'd been in for over 13 years (rather than do any upgrading!). In that case I said I wasn't happy to have prospective purchasers over the property under the circumstances, although I agreed that the agents could come in to take photos etc. The owners of the property agreed to back off. This was a bit different however - most landlords would prefer to have a seemless change over, to avoid 'down time' for the property. I think everybody is entitled to 'quiet enjoyment' of the property they are renting, so if this visiting becomes disruptive then I'd say so. You might take your issues, and the Lease, to your local Citizens Advice people, who will tell you your rights.

    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    Would you rather they didn't do a safety inspection if one is needed? You're living there with your baby, don't you want to know that the building is up to code? If they weren't properly inspected and there was a fire or something you know you'd be suing them up the wazoo.

    Of course your landlord can come in with notice. They could even come in without notice if there was a good reason like a fire or flood.

    11:30 am is a perfectly reasonable time too. It just happened to inconvenience you because your child was sleeping.

    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • 10 years ago

    There isn't enough information here to determine if you can fight them on this issue.

    First, read your lease...see if there are any provisions in it regarding the landlord's right to enter.

    Second, unless it was an emergency, for the most part, they are only supposed to come in during business hours about 8 am through 6 pm and it sounds like they entered at night.

    Third, what was their reason for entering your apartment? This is a pivotal piece of information.

    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    Yes, they can even post the notice on a communal bulletin board when regular maintenance is scheduled.

    Add: Chanteuse, clearly they came in the morning from the description. Also, as long as they gave reasonable notice, the reason is irrelevant.

    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • Teekno
    Lv 7
    10 years ago

    You can ask them to call and leave you a message next time. But, I am sure it's legal under the laws of your state and your lease.

    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • 10 years ago

    in most states, with advance notice like they say they left, at any reasonable hour, and for a reasonable purpose, yes.

    Source(s): ex-landlord
    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • 10 years ago

    Most leases have similar provisions. Read yours and I'm sure you'll find it.

    • Log in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.