An Unanswered Question . . .?

Ives' "The Unanswered Question" to be precise. I heard this work for the first time at an orchestral concert (not a specially avant-garde concert, either). During the piece, after a diminuendo, the entire orchestra began playing and it was about a minute before I realised I was hearing Leonora no. 3,... show more Ives' "The Unanswered Question" to be precise. I heard this work for the first time at an orchestral concert (not a specially avant-garde concert, either). During the piece, after a diminuendo, the entire orchestra began playing and it was about a minute before I realised I was hearing Leonora no. 3, the final piece in the concert. It took me so long because I wasn't expecting it to start immediately.

Does anyone know if Ives put a direction in "The Unanswered Question" for the next work to begin "attacca", or is this just the conductor thinking out of the box?
Update: Thank you all. The conductor was Gianluigi Gelmetti, who had the Sydney SO for the middle five years of last decade. He had some surprising ideas (though I don't mean it was a surprise-a-concert), and some that were just gratuitous. At an all-Ravel night, he finished "Mother Goose" quietly and without lowering the... show more Thank you all. The conductor was Gianluigi Gelmetti, who had the Sydney SO for the middle five years of last decade. He had some surprising ideas (though I don't mean it was a surprise-a-concert), and some that were just gratuitous. At an all-Ravel night, he finished "Mother Goose" quietly and without lowering the baton began "Bolero" very softly. Interesting effect.
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