What is f'(x) if f(x) = ln(x+1)^3?

Been sitting here for 20 minutes looking at this problem and dont have a clue.

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago
    Favourite answer

    Assuming you mean ln( (x+1)^3 )

    the 3 can be brought down to the front using laws of exponents

    f(x) = 3 ln(x+1)

    The derivative of an Ln function is the derivative of whats inside over the original.

    so if f(x) = ln ( g(x) ) then f'(x) = g'(x)/g(x)

    and remember the 3 is a constant multiple so you can pull it out front while taking the derivative

    so....

    f'(x) = 3 (1/(x+1))

    simplify

    f'(x) = 3/(x+1)

    Source(s): Pursuing engineering degree
  • DWRead
    Lv 7
    6 years ago

    F'(x) = (1/(x+1)^3)3(x+1)^2 = 3/(x+1)

  • 6 years ago

    f(x) = ln(x+1)³

    f'(x) = ln'(x+1)³

  • 6 years ago

    f(x) = ln(x+1)^3

    f'(x) = 3ln(x + 1)^2 d/dx 1/(x + 1) d/dx 1

    ......3ln^2(x + 1)

    = ------------------------ answer//

    .........x + 1

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