Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 1 year ago

Which direction does a black hole rotate?

13 Answers

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  • goring
    Lv 6
    1 year ago

    It depends on the observer

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  • 1 year ago

    Clockwise

    Attachment image
    Source(s): Nature
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  • 1 year ago

    There is no preferred direction, a black hole can rotate in any direction. And in reality the direction would be dependent upon your vantage point.

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  • 1 year ago

    Each black hole rotates differently.

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    • neb
      Lv 7
      1 year agoReport

      I see the issue we are having now. It is how we are interpreting the OP’s question. I’m interpreting it (and I assume the same for Jeffrey) that the OP is asking about the direction of the axis of rotation, otherwise it makes little sense.

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  • 1 year ago

    It doesn't have a direction of spin per se. If the infalling matter is moving opposite to the hole's spin, it will slow down the rotation of the hole. As for clockwise or counter-clockwise, there is no difference between the two. If a black hole spins clockwise when seen from "above", then it will (simultaneously) spin counter-clockwise when seen from "below

    • aladdinwa
      Lv 7
      1 year agoReport

      The twisting of space by the Singularity's gravity will cause the accretion disk/ring to spin in the same direction as the rotation of the Singularity.

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  • neb
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    The axis of rotation of a black hole results from the sum total of the angular momentum of all the matter and energy that is in the black hole. So, black holes can rotate in any direction. For example, the axis of rotation of a black hole formed from a stellar collapse is in the direction of the axis of rotation of the star that formed the black hole.

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    • neb
      Lv 7
      1 year agoReport

      Ah, after reading your comment to JeffreyK I see the issue. It is how we are interpreting the OP’s question. I’m interpreting it (and I assume the same for Jeffrey) that the OP is asking about the direction of the axis of rotation, otherwise it makes little sense.

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  • Bill-M
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Depends on where you looking at it from.

    Like asking what direction does the Earth Rotate. Clockwise or Counter Clockwise.

    The answer is BOTH.

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  • 1 year ago

    With a mass of many suns, any direction it wants to.

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    If you look at it from the top, it's clockwise, if you look at it from the bottom, it's counterclockwise. Or is it the opposite? Doesn't matter anyways.

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    • Lv 7
      1 year agoReport

      It really doesn't matter, everything could be reversed and we wouldn't know the difference and it wouldn't make a difference.

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  • 1 year ago

    That depends on where you are looking at it from.

    If you are looking at it from above the north pole, it is rotating counter-clockwise.

    If you are looking at it from above the south pole, it is rotating clockwise.

    If you are looking at the equator, with the north pole to the top, it is rotating from left to right.

    If you are looking at the equator, with the south pole to the top, it is rotating from right to left.

    Or, more simply, a Black Hole is rotating in the same direction as the accretion disk surrounding it.

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