Jay asked in Science & MathematicsPhysics · 1 year ago

Why wood floats on water but steel doesn't? a heavy thousand pound of woods can float, but a light weight of a gram of steel sinks?

18 Answers

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  • 1 year ago

    Steel floats see all the metal ships out there?

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  • 1 year ago

    steel will float... IF NOT What are Ships now days made of...

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  • John
    Lv 4
    1 year ago

    Wood doesn't float on water it sinks also.

    It simply takes more time for it to get to the bottom due to it's density.

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  • oubaas
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    It is the density ratio between body and liquid/fluid which tells you whether or not a certain body float or sinks while immerged in a certain liquid or fluid.

    If such ratio is > 1, the body will sink , otherwise it will float , and this is due to what Archimede discovered 23 centuries ago : buoyant force is equal to the weight of the liquid/fluid the immerged body is displacing

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  • Will
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Some people just aren't meant to learn

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  • It's the density of the materials, while steel and wood both have a grain wood is not as dense os steel which is why wood becomes waterlogged and steel does not.

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  • Tom
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Everything BEGINS to SINK as it is immersed in water----Water pushes back with the force of the weight of the amount of water the object displaces.----A chunk of wood will sink until it pushes away it's own weight in water---then stops sinking.---A piece of steel will begin to sink too, but being smaller for its weight, will GO UNDER before it can displace its equivalent weight of water.---But it IS lighter under water by what it HAS displaced in water, but not enough to hold it up and let it float

    The only way to make the steel float is to beat it into a thin sheet and fold it into a bucket or pan, so it can push away MORE water and hopefully a volume that weighs as much as the steel---before it can go under.

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  • 1 year ago

    Archimedes Principle. As simply as possible, an object in water has two forces acting on it. The force of gravity acting downward and a buoyancy force acting upward. Archimedes principle says that the upward buoyancy force is equal to the weight of the displaced water. The bottom line is that if an object is less dense than water, its buoyancy force is greater than the gravitational force and it floats. If its density is greater than water, the buoyancy force is less than the gravitational force and it sinks.

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  • 1 year ago

    It has to do with the density of the material in comparison to the density of the water that it displaces. Not all types of wood float. The denser ones actually sink.

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    not all wood floats.

    things that are more dense than the liquid they are in will sink, things that are less dense than the liquid they are in will float.

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