AS per theory what is the size of the so called singularity that was responsible for the formation of a very vast physical Universe?

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago
    Favourite answer

    It's a hypothesis, most of this stuff is, can't be proven, probably ever. It's a black hole, they reckon that an atom in a black hole is about 99.99% smaller in volume, compared to it's mass, which remains the same. My view is that the only thing that could have caused anything to happen in a singularity of infinite density in which time didn't exist was an action, such as the big crunch of the previous universe, black holes smashing back into the main one, left after the last big bang, with all the rest of the universe in them. This would be the force necessary to turn that motionless nothing back into fast moving energy. They say it was a quantum fluctuation, which is basically just them saying they don't know, but the big bang was originally taken as proof of the literal truth of Genesis, by the majority of scientists of the time, and religion played a huge role, particularly in this field. They suppressed Einstein's cycling universe theory, sent him death threats, and pretty much told him what they wanted him to say, which wasn't what he thought.

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  • Dixon
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    goring!

  • cosmo
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Unknown. You're asking a "Strong Quantum Gravity" question, and we have no theory of strong quantum gravity.

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  • Paula
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    "As per theory"

    the singularity has zero size - it is a dimensionless point.

    It is a discontinuity in space time.

    We do not know of any mechanism that can "empty" a singularity back into normal space.

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  • 1 year ago

    Infinitly small untill it exploded

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  • 1 year ago

    The current observable universe was once less than 10^-29 meters in radius. Maybe a lot smaller, but there is still some debate about that, among serious scientists.

    10^-19 m is much much smaller than an atom.

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  • 1 year ago

    The "size" was very certainly it's least important attribute. Your question should be about it's MASS, not it's size. Mass is relevant here, scale is not. I'm curious however; since you clearly don't believe the science anyway, what difference does it make to you how big or massive the singularity was?

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    • Lv 7
      1 year agoReport

      Yeah, that's stupid. I don't think he's that smart really.

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