DarkSide asked in PetsDogs · 1 year ago

Yorkshire aggressive towards puppy. Help!?

I’ve recently got a new female Yorkshire puppy, it’s been with us for a few days now and is my current male yorkie’s offspring. The dog is fine with it being in the house until it runs up and tries to play with him. He starts barking/growling at her but as of yet hasn’t harmed her. We’ve tried holding the puppy so our current dog can get used to it but he’s too scared to approach the puppy and avoids contact at all cost... how do I help him get used to the new puppy?

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  • 1 year ago
    Favourite answer

    Puppies are excitable, lovable hooligans. They have bursts of unbelievable energy, however in order to grow they need lots of sleep. New puppies need a room where they can rest and sleep and the other dogs in the house need respite. Older dogs don’t want puppies biting their ears and chewing their necks. How would you cope with an unruly toddler twenty four hours a day? Would you be annoyed if you had a toddler thrust upon you who pulled your hair and poked your eyes? I am sure that you would grumble.

    Please don’t expect your dog to cope with an unruly puppy and to baby-sit twenty four hours a day. Supervise them for SHORT play sessions, then put your puppy in a quiet place to rest. (DON’T PUT THE OLDER DOG OUT, YOU MUST MAKE IT FEEL SPECIAL) I am not a big fan of crates, however if you do not have a utility room or a separate place where you can leave the puppy, a crate might be an alternative. Don’t expect your older dog to want to sleep with your puppy or to play with it constantly.

    Your puppy will possibly need about four meals a day. Divide your other dog’s rations into four and feed it at the same time. At the outset you must ensure that your puppy cannot steal the food from your other dogs. Perhaps you can put the puppy on a lead, or create enough space to ensure that the puppy does not steal. However it is important that your other dog, or dogs knows that the puppy is not getting preferential treatment and that they are all being fed when the puppy is fed.

    Give your existing dog or dogs extra attention when the puppy is resting and make them feel special.

    There will be visitors, who want to see your puppy. If the doorbells rings when your puppy is with your other dogs, put your puppy into another room and tell your visitors to fuss your adult dog or dogs and provide treats for your visitors to give them, BEFORE the puppy is allowed out to greet your visitors.

    Older dogs love puppies, with the proviso that YOU stop the puppy from being a pain in the bum. They don’t want a puppy being thrust upon them all of the time. If you do this any dog will object and be confused.

    There are people on this site who will tell you to let them sort themselves out. If you leave them to do this, they will probably have fights when the puppy matures.

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  • 1 year ago

    Make every encounter a good one, your puppy may be too much for him to handle right now. You could try to tire the puppy out before letting the pup play with your older dog. Some dogs cant handle the energy a pup has.

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  • 1 year ago

    It always happens this way when you bring in a new dog. ALWAYS!

    Google, 'introducing a new dog to home dog'. Why people don't know this is beyond me. Everyone goes into a panic cause they simply do not understand or have no knowledge of dogs in general.

    As a Canine Behaviorist I find the ignorance/lack of education very astounding. Most people do not understand the simplest things about dogs & that surprises me. Dogs would be much happier if they were understood.

    • DarkSide1 year agoReport

      Believe me I have googled it and I’ve done everything websites are suggesting and to try help my dog in the best way possible, I’ve decided to ask here too. Both the dogs are much better now and are learning to get along. People learn new things all the time, don’t bash someone for needing help.

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  • 1 year ago

    then separate them obviously

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  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    You could learn a lot about dog behaviour by watching what you older dog is doing and barking/growling is NOT aggressive it is warning this invader not to behave like it is doing and later on you will see a pup that watches it n=manners around the older dog but is not so well mannered around you or the other humans that are unclear with commands, unclear about what is acceptable or not ...then you will start asking how to stop x behaviour or y behaviour as the pup is turning into a thug

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  • 1 year ago

    You should have introduced them on NEUTRAL territory; NOT inside your home or yard. He is upset, by having HIS territory "INVADED".

    She has no understanding of ANY "dog rules". So running up and getting HIS FACE (and space) is extremely rude and inappropriate. He has a perfect RIGHT to correct or warn her NOT TO DO THAT => by barking or growling at her. If you've corrected him for barking or growling to warn her off (WRONG on YOUR PART) that may be WHY he is now avoiding her and any issues of confrontation, that WILL occur.

    You need to control your little brainless NINNY of a puppy. He is (for now) the alpha and ought to be setting how she approaches & whether (or not) he agrees to play WITH her. She should show respect - towards him and you need to stop INSISTING he show deference to HER (an invading puppy brat) or INSIST he "LIKE" her. NOT YOUR CALL to make. No adult dog ought to ever be asked to play "second fiddle" to a puppy. That is UPSIDE DOWN behavior, opposite from any normal dog pack. No, he is not allowed to HURT her but he should be allowed to CORRECT her, and call the shots in his home.

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