Anonymous
Anonymous asked in PetsHorses · 1 year ago

Why does my aunts 8yo quarter horse keep following me then trying to bite me and how can I make him stop?

Update:

My aunt dosent give him treats and hes not broken. He also dosent have a lot of human attention

7 Answers

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  • John
    Lv 4
    12 months ago

    It's normal. Just ignore it. It'll go away. Just ignore the bites they'll heal.

    Ok I won't be coy. It's unbroken it'll always do that without being quirted. Unless you want to spend days or months talking to it until it knows you.

    It probably does that with your aunt too.

    It's possessive.

    Normally with an unbroken pony you can snap your quirt loudly and it'll cause the animal to circle.

    Then you can approach quietly to calm it.

    But the american is a wilder tame animal so when it circles you need to be careful of it kicking.

    But basically you calm the animal it doesn't know you or realise your it's friend.

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  • 1 year ago

    Why are you in that horses field? Stay out of his field and it won't be a problem for him anymore.

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  • 1 year ago

    Turn around and stand up straight, and be calm but stern and tell it to back off, and slowly walk towards it, to make it know to follow your direction. Horses are herd animals, and if you show them who's boss, they'll submit.

    • partly cloudy
      Lv 7
      1 year agoReport

      Or the horse, which is loose, will just turn around and kick the kid in the face. It could go either way.

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  • 1 year ago

    my advice would be to check your pants for carrots! it happened to me with my newbor churckles!

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  • 1 year ago

    He's probably been fed a lot of treats and has come to expect them from everyone.

    When the treats don't magically materialize, he follows you to see if you're going to produce one.

    When you stop moving, he's going to nibble your pockets, escalating to biting you, looking for those treats.

    Even if you have a treat and give it him, he'll still want another.

    This is why over-treating is a bad idea. It leads to expectations, which leads to bad behavior, which leads to injured people and disappointed horses.

    He needs retraining. Stay out of his pasture so he won't follow you. When/if you want to work with him, halter him and put him on a lead rope so you can control him. Keep your eye on him. If he goes to bite you, say "NO!" sharply. If he tries again, repeat that while yanking the lead rope once. When he desists, immediately reward him by loosening up on the lead.

    This will take time and effort, and NO TREATS.

    • zephania666
      Lv 7
      1 year agoReport

      Could someone else have given him treats, either before she got him or surreptitiously over the fence?

      Think about it.

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  • 1 year ago

    stay away from the horse

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  • 1 year ago

    That’s weird

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