Are the old theories on false vacuum still accurate today?

While I was still researching about the Higgs field I decided to look at the older papers from the 1980s and one part had me a bit confused.

http://inspirehep.net/record/21273 this is one of the articles I read and one thing had me curious.... do all these old theories around false vacuum and vacuum decay have the same probability of happening? Like chances of vacuum decay or false vacuum are really low but is this the same for all theories around it from this century and especially the old ones from the 80s like this one and many others. Also in that paper it talks about a consequence happening in a de sitter or de sitter like space-time , is our universe anything like that at all? Let me know your thoughts on this

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  • 5 months ago
    Best answer

    No one really knows how a false vacuum decays or its probability. We have never seen a false vacuum in nature or in a laboratory. We don't know if our space is a high energy false vacuum or a ground state true vacuum. But since it has not decayed in 14 billion years, I'm very sure it is in its ground true vacuum state.

    • Brandon5 months agoReport

      My guess is that it’s still nothing to worry about no matter what theory you choose. Am I right or wrong?

  • neb
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Quit worrying about electroweak vacuums and vacuum decay. It ain’t gonna happen.

    A de Sitter space is a maximally symmetric space with positive curvature. For instance, if you have a universe totally devoid of matter/energy but with a positive cosmological constant, you have a de Sitter space. Any space with a homogenous matter/energy distribution and positive curvature would be considered de Sitter like ...

    • neb
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      We know as much about the Higgs as any other particle. We predicted the Higgs 50 years ago. We know it is an uncharged scalar spin 0 boson. We know what it’s mass is. We know how it broke electroweak symmetry - this is all part of the standard model of physics.

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