Am I the only one who stresses over expiration dates?

Whenever I see a food item that hasn't been thrown even a day over the expiration date I get stressed out. Are they really just suggestions? How do you actually know the food you eat isn't actually expired or not?

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    5 months ago
    Best answer

    No. Plenty of people think they are gospel truth and end up wasting food. Anyway, there is no such thing as an expiration date. There are "sell by" and "best before" dates, NOT expiration dates. And the dates are there to protect the store, not you. To that end, they are always set a little early.

    Food does not suddenly expire on one day. It deteriorates gradually. How do you think anyone managed in the days when there were no marked dates on anything? We used our senses, that's how - smell or taste it.

    Learn not to worry so much. I totally ignore dates and actually look at the food.

  • 5 months ago

    They are usually sell-by dates. I just opened a package of cream cheese which said "best if used by June 12. It's July 16th and the cream cheese tastes just fine

  • 5 months ago

    Yes yesterday was

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    No you're not the only one who gets stressed out over expiration dates, I get stressed out by a lot of expiration dates on things too! Except for on honey of course, because they say honey never expires! In fact modern day archaeologists have found pots of very good honey in Ancient Egyptian tombs that were like 10,000 5,000 or 8,000 years old and it wasn't spoiled after those thousands of years! They also found it in the country on the east of the Black Sea region called Georgia (that was once part of the USSR and is no longer part of the USSR anymore) that was very old and they found it in the Ancient city of Catalhuyuk in Turkey and they probably tasted some of that thousand year old honey and it was still edible! Hope This Helped! 🍯

    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/the-...

    They're talking about the country Georgia that is east of the black sea region not the USA state Georgia (just so you know so that way you won't be confused with the USA Georgia the state that is known for growing its southern peaches)

    https://www.georgianjournal.ge/discover-georgia/35...

    • nocountmf5 months agoReport

      and before it was a part of the ussr it was part of a region called Georgia....

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  • 5 months ago

    Yes, they really are just suggestions. Fresh meat should be used or frozen as close to the package date as possible. Canned goods and dried foods are still perfectly fine for years.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Okay, first, NO KIND OF FOOD “EXPIRES”.

    Food that is in a packaging normally has either a “best before” date or a “use by” date. The main purpose of these dates is so that you can see how fresh something is before you buy it. For example, if I buy pre-packed meat in a supermarket I check the ones at the back of the row or bottom of the pile to see if there's one with a “use by” date that's after the ones at the front.

    “Best before” dates suggest that after that date the product MIGHT have deteriorated. Something that's meant to be crisp may be a little soft. Something that's meant to be moist may be a little dry. The consistency might be too thick or too thin, the colour might be wrong. Chocolate sometimes has a bloom on it. This is exactly the same with food you might cook or bake at home. Home-made bread goes dry very quickly, so does cake. The chances are that many of the things with “best before” dates would be fine months or even years later. Canned food, provided the can isn't damaged, should literally last decades. On the other hand most loose fresh fruit and vegetables have no date on them at all - it's assumed that the customer will have enough sense not to eat rotten fruit and vegetables and that they'll be able to tell that a lettuce is wilted

    If you have something that is past its “best before” date and want to know if it's still okay then the ONLY way to tell is to try it. Look at it, smell it and taste it.

    With “use by” dates, in theory, the food could be inedible after that date - it might smell bad, taste bad and could even make you ill. But, again these dates tend to be very conservative and, again, the only way to tell if the food is okay is to examine it.

    Personally, I don't usually keep fresh meat (and that includes fish) after its “use by” date - I don't throw it away, I either don't buy the food in the first place, I use it before the “use by” date or I freeze it.

    Now, I know, this is the bit that sounds rude and I really don't mean to be but, a person who can't tell whether something as basic as food has “gone off” or just noticeably deteriorated really shouldn't be buying food or preparing their own meals. No one should need a date printed on packaging to tell them whether food is fresh enough to eat. There are idiots who post here who don't know enough to tell if milk or eggs are bad - that's frightening (I could tell when I was about eight). Note also that these dates apply only if the food is unopened and has been stored correctly. Milk might go off in a matter of hours if left in the warm sun. Bread will dry out very quickly if you put in in the fridge. Despite any “best before” date, jam should last for years BUT, open it and get some crumbs of bread and a smearing of butter in it from your knife and you'll get mould growing on it very quickly unless you refrigerate it. Canned food lasts just about forever BUT not once you've opened it.

    Everyone needs to be able to use some common sense but a lot of (I guess young people) posting here just don't seem to have any.

    Food dating was introduced to help the consumer. When I was a child my mother would sometimes buy milk that was, “on the turn” already, or bread that was obviously not very fresh, cream that was off the following day and, sometimes, the occasional egg that was bad. Food dating means that can't happen now: no one can pass of old food as fresh.

    A lot of young people just seem lost by it though.

    @ Joe, you're an idiot, of course food doesn't expire. Look up the word in a dictionary. You make my point very well - clueless.

    Added, to these idiots who think food “expires” - upload a picture of a label on ordinary food (not baby food or drugs) that says “expires”. The word expires dies NOT mean goes stale or goes bad. Of course food goes bad or stale but anyone can see when that happens (or they should be able to.

    How stupid are some of you people?

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    No, you are not the only misguided neurotic out there. :-)

    Those are NOT expiration dates. Those are "best by" dates. Those dates are the dates to which the manufacturer guarantees the best quality taste and texture. The dates have NOTHING to do with food safety, and there is nothing magical about them whereby food is top quality one day and then garbage the next.

  • Bee V2
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    My mom is the opposite of me when it comes to expiration dates, they make me anxious even though I know it should still be good a few days after the date, but my brain cant help but think its gross past that date. My mom thinks theyre suggestions. It all depends on the product. For example, milk's expiration date should be abided by. But if it was something like say cereal, you could keep going for a few days after

    • Bee V2
      Lv 6
      5 months agoReport

      Milk is certainly something that has an expiration date, whether that's what you call it or not

  • Mark
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    I "stress" over MILK expiration dates. (I really don't like the unpleasantness of even TASTING sour milk, let alone DRINKING it.) But for other stuff, not so much. Either it's the taste quality has diminished, or the store has been unusually conservative in what the expiry date it. For instance, with meats, I have found they usually are good for a few days after the expiry date, and indefinitely if frozen.

    • RICK
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Once again the date on milk is a "sell by" date it is NOT an expiration date

  • 5 months ago

    Most of the "expiration dates" are nonsense, and they are relatively irrelevant EXCEPT for stuff like dairy products, bakery goods, produce, meat, etc.

    Canned and packaged goods can be fresh for literally centuries.

    • RICK
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Even dairy is good for a few days past the sell by date

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