Modern petrol.. is this right?

My biker mate has told me not to consider a carbed bike as modern fuels play havoc with the riubbers in the carbs and fuel tap

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  • JetDoc
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    It's the ethanol in "modern" gasoline that eats up old rubber fuel lines and corrodes the internal parts of old carburetors that are found on antique motors. Pretty much ANY motorcycle built since the 1980's SHOULD be OK to run on gasoline that contains up to 10% ethanol (E-10 gas). Try to avoid E-15 or higher ethanol mixes.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Never noticed the difference. Rubbers do go no matter what the fuel - it is called AGE. E15 or E0 = no difference. Too old rubbers will crack.& disintegrate. Time to rebuild anyways.

    • Cap'n. America
      Lv 4
      5 months agoReport

      My 1983 Honda eventually needed 2 needles. Not bad, considering her age. Asshole dealer wants $28 each, and there are 4 of them..they look exactly like the $7 needles for my Chevy.

  • 5 months ago

    This is not only a problem for carb'd vehicles. Fuel which is high in ethanol may damage some rubber component s used in fuel systems, but not all. Don't use an ethanol blend if your bike or car is not set up for it. Go with regular unleaded gasoline.

    • Cap'n. America
      Lv 4
      5 months agoReport

      My '80 and '86 cages run Fine on all but E85. Toyota got 50 MPG, once. My '83 CB650SC , fine. Eventually needed 2 needles, due to extreme age, not aky.

  • 5 months ago

    Depends on ACTUAL MOTORCYCLE, ACTUAL FUEL in market. E10 with 10% ethanol in USA markets various states can be a problem in vehicles made before 1987, sometime a fatal problem- the Carter Carburator used in some 1970 era medium cars- chrysler slant 6, ford 200 inch series and some AMC had a accelator pump diaphram that would be holed by the E10 later introduced, try to leave at green light, stall in middle of intersection and get hit by car from right angle as light changed . Harley not certifide for E10 until about 1985, Federal rules have 1987 date and my Goldwing G1000 has fuel pump with no newer replacement so will fail with E10 or even worse E15. Replaced with failed one with OEM pattern and I use local 91 octane NONETHANOL marked at pump as such. Same with CM400 that I had to clean carbs, BMW /2 and /5 also not made for ethanol - float made from some plastics will be eaten by ethanol, flood out, run very rich so use the metal floats, be prepared to change float needles. Petrol term implies UK poster, some minor problems noted for a few classics but I don't know of any fuel formula changes in that market other than long changed leaded to unleaded gasoline/petrol standards. Wouldn't surprise me to find out some 'clean burn' additives might mess up older fel systems.

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    No that is not accurate. However it can turn a fibreglass tank soft.

  • 5 months ago

    E-fuel seems to last longer in larger fuel tanks but sucks in the smaller/less used engines like lawnmowers/weed-whackers.

  • 5 months ago

    If your machine is very old, yes.

    • Cap'n. America
      Lv 4
      5 months agoReport

      Old Packard carb bowls leak bad, especially on alcohol fuel. Need a bronze bowl.

  • 5 months ago

    Not true, unless you are using race specific fuel, which may, but even then, I doubt it.

  • 5 months ago

    He's talking rubbish, at least if you live in Britain. Both my bikes, FZ1 and VFR750 have carbs and I've hand no trouble at all.

    • Cap'n. America
      Lv 4
      5 months agoReport

      How old are your 'sickles? My '83 Honda finally needed 2 new needles.

  • 5 months ago

    it aint easy being cheesy lemon squeezey

    • Cap'n. America
      Lv 4
      5 months agoReport

      Real easy to be a troll, though. Why not do something Constructive, give a tin of beans to the Food Bank? Nice Ride over there.

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