What is the verb in this Sentence cook is a verb but can it change form like this. John was cooking yesterday Cooking is a noun though 🤔?

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Can it change its form?

    Yes.

    When the verb is conjugated, it can change its form.

    When the verb tense is changed, it can change its form.

  • Roger
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    In the sentence you quote "cooking" is probably part of a compound verb "was cooking." If "cooking" is meant "really doing well" in a slang sense (a band can be "really cooking") "cooking" could be an adjective. In that case it would be a gerundive, or an adjective. "Cooking" can be a gerund as well, a noun, an "-ing" word made from a verb.: "Cooking is a good way to relieve stress," for example. So verbs depending on their form can be verbs, adjectives, or nouns. They can also be present participles: "cooking sausages, he thought of his father."

    • John P
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      The form "cooking" can be a present or past participle in English, and in fact most "-ing" words you see are participles. Yes, you do sometimes see expressions such as "Her cooking was terrible", "My driving is improving", where the "-ing" wortd is a noun.

  • 5 months ago

    'Cooking is my favourite pastime.' In this sentence, 'cooking' is a noun.

    But in your sentence, 'John was cooking yesterday', the verb is 'was cooking'.

    I am going to town tomorrow - 'am going' is a verb.

    She is watching TV. They were swimming. We'll be eating at 6. He had been sitting still for a long time.

    ALL of these are verbs.

  • Speed
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    The verb is the past progressive verb, "was cooking."

    Cooking, like a lot of -ing words, can serve as a noun. When it does, it's called a gerund.

    Cooking is difficult.

    Cooking brings me joy.

    I'm no good at cooking.

    (It can be an adjective, too, but let's not borrow trouble.)

    But "is cooking" and "was cooking" (along with will be, shall have been, yada-yada-yada) is using the word cooking as a verb.

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  • 5 months ago

    Cooking is a direct object and participle. Yes, it is noun and a gerund, a verb acting as a noun. The verb in this sentence is the past tense of the verb to be.

    Take a foreign language course. I mean for years, to the intermediate level. A took Latin in middle school, French in high school and college and German in college. I learned far more about English grammar in the Latin, French and Bean classes than I ever did in English class. Italian I'd modern day Latin.

    • Mike
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Jean cuisinait. We use two words. To say the same thing, the French use one word.

  • 5 months ago

    cooking is not a noun. it is an action making it a verb. but john could be called a cook, which would be a noun because it describes

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    It's showing action in your example. Verb.

  • 5 months ago

    When you use a verb as a noun, that's called a gerund.

    In the sentence 'John was cooking yesterday.', cooking is a verb. John is the subject. What did he do? He cooked. 'Was cooking' is past perfect tense.

    But in the sentence 'Cooking is a noun', the word 'cooking' is a noun! It's a gerund. Do you like cooking? Cooking is a good skill. My father does the cooking. In all these cases 'cooking' is a noun, a gerund.

    • Speed
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Psst! Past perfect would be "had cooked."

  • Mike
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    was cooking is the verb cook in the imperfect tense.

  • 5 months ago

    No, in this case it's a verb.

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