Joseph B asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 6 months ago

If the South Had Won at Gettysburg, Would That Have Prompted England and France to Extend Diplomatic Recognition to the Confederacy?

I am thinking that it was the U.S. victory at Saratoga that induced the French to recognize and give financial support to the Americans during the Revolutionary War. The Americans needed to prove that they had a chance of defeating the British, and it was not until Saratoga that they did so, at least in a way that persuaded the French. A Southern victory at Gettysburg would have been at least as significant as the victory in Saratoga, since the South would have been in possession of Northern territory. I know there is no absolute answer to an "alternative history" question, but I am curious as to what people might think. Thanks.

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  • 6 months ago
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    Doubtful. In the spring of 1861, warehouses in Europe were bulging with surplus cotton, which later soared in price. In addition, the British would have risked the loss of American grain supplies, risk to Canada, and much of the British merchant marine.

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  • 6 months ago

    No. This wouldn't have proven that the South could win and neither Britain or France stood to gain anything from recognizing the Confederacy. Both countries remained neutral because they did not want to antagonize either the North or the South.

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  • 6 months ago

    Even if they had, SO WHAT?? The Northern armies still had twice the numbers of troops. And Lee simply didn't have the troops & military power to take Washington DC. And there was still the Undefeated US Grant and his army in the West.

    What the Confederacy desperately needed was more soldiers, more men. And they simply didn't have them.

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  • 6 months ago

    It could have been a possibility

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    I don't think so. The south was actuaIIy banking on EngIand to heIp them out from the beginning. EngIand basicaIIy told them screw you, we have Egyptian cotton now.

    • Joseph B
      Lv 5
      6 months agoReport

      The Southerners were the political, and in some cases, biological, ancestors of the "belief over facts" crowd we see today. They fervently believed that Cotton was King, that England could not do without it, and seceded on that basis, without ever once bothering to ask the English if that was true.

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