Leo asked in Home & GardenGarden & Landscape · 3 months ago

What happens when roots get inside drain lines?

10 Answers

Relevance
  • 3 months ago

    That happened at my old house. The roots grow and expand, cracking the lines. They grow wherever it is wet, and clog everything.

  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    That normally happens when you have a septic field AND you have planted trees over the field. The roots look for moisture and find it in the drain tiles. They just get in and block up the drain lines enough that you have to pull all the trees out of the ground and then get an excavator to dig a new septic field beside the old one. Look at the back of your hand . The thumb is the plumbing from the house and the back of the hand is the septic tank and the 4 outstretched fingers are the 4 drain tile lines under the back lawn. Maybe half a back yard. The excavator has to drive in and dig 4 new trenches on the other half of the yard to lay new drain tile and it has to reconnect to the septic tank. Very stinky smell for WEEKS at a cost of $20,000.00. Then the excavator leaves and you got to fix the back yard again. That is why most yards are fairly sparse when it comes to trees, especially Weeping Willows for they root deep and cedars or only half the yard has trees or the trees are far away. If trees are all over the yard then chance are good they are on SEWER which pipes everything out. or the septic field is in the front yard. Again no trees. or it blocks it up. Digging it up is really the only way out.

  • 3 months ago

    They block the drains. And then cost a fortune to get cleared.

  • 3 months ago

    Same as tampons.

  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • gerald
    Lv 7
    3 months ago

    you get bigger trees its the fertiliser you see you know what happens you get leaks and stinks first

  • chris
    Lv 7
    3 months ago

    Simple answer?

    First time some idiot flushes a tampon, paper towel or wet wipe down the toilet, it will snag on the roots and within a day or two you will be paying a plumber to auger it out.

    If the plumber is good and uses a root cutter bit, you should be good for a few months.

    If he just uses a "cork screw" type bit, the very next idiot is going to clog it up again.

    Cheaper in the long run to have it repaired!

  • frank
    Lv 7
    3 months ago

    If the lines are made of fiber glass, the roots cannot get in. If they are ceramic, the roots will continue to grow until the flow stops. What will happen next is that the discharges will back up, and if there is a concrete man hole, it will be forced up by the sewage to run free in the property, and onto the street. You will also have toilets over flowing, and odors in the bathroom and the kitchen sinks. Sometimes a telescope is used to find the roots under ground and cut them off, but that would be a temporary relief as the roots will grow back.

  • 3 months ago

    The roots can and will eventually start to slow and even block your waste from getting to the city sewer pipes below your street, or to your backyard septic system. Word to wise: This doesn't just affect your toilets...it can also affect your shower/bath and washer drainage.

    A few years back, doll hair or some type of material completely blocked the main drainage pipe leaving our house. And, when we started washing clothes, all the water flooded half of our house.

    If you have roots in your home plumbing pipes, the best thing to do is to rotor-rooter the pipes to cut away the roots. Depending on where these roots are in your sewer system, can determine whether you can rent a rotor-rooter machine from your local hardware store, and clear the pipes yourself. Understand: this is not a job for everyone. You Tube has plenty of videos showing how to do this, but it's not as easy as it looks in the videos. Some people have serious issues going on in their plumbing.

    Hiring a plumber is very expensive, but you'll get a good idea of where your problems are if they use a camera and explore your plumbing. Depending on your access points to your pipes will also determine how they clear your blockage. The plumbers could not access our pipes from the roof, so they had to remove our hallway toilet, which by the way was about $550.

    You can also try using a foaming root killer, which they sell at Walmart. Many folks online and in You Tube videos swear by it. We used it a few months back to see if it keeps the roots from growing in our pipes. Truth is, the roots love the mixture of human waste and water--it's fertilizer for the roots of trees. It's candy to the roots.

    Regardless of what you try, once the roots penetrate the pipes, they won't stop. The only way of stopping it permanently is to replace the pipes, and that's extremely expensive, depending on your home plumbing system. I'm talking about in the thousands of dollars. Remember, if you have a foundation, the plumbers have to get underneath and into the foundation to replace draining pipes. E-x-p-e-n-s-i-v-e. That's what insurance is for.

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/ROEBIC-1LB-ROOT-KILLER/...

  • 3 months ago

    make leaks in the drain and block the regular flow. Your waste does not go where you think it is going.

  • 3 months ago

    They continue to grow towards the nearest exit, usually your toilet or sink. They can clog up the pipe something terrible and require a major snaking to clean out.

Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.