Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Family & RelationshipsFamily · 6 months ago

Could my mom’s overprotective nature have to do with me being a Aboriginal teenage girl?

It might be a normal parent thing but she worries about me getting killed/missing too. If you Google “Highway of Tears”, you’ll see that dozens of Aboriginal girls have been murdered on that street due to racism. And I live on that very same province. That’s what my friend pointed out to me. We learned at school that previous ancestors suffered from trauma too, etc. My mom has always feared CPS might discriminate against her and stuff too, so she never wants to seem like a bad parent. I just looked it up and found out that a big number of foster kids in Canada (and maybe USA??) are Native American. Ive always wondered why she seemed kinda paranoid. But now I know about this history stuff and I’m beginning to wonder if this is the reason why she fears.

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  • Foofa
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    I have plenty of relatives in BC who aren't First Nations and are likewise overprotective. But it's a fact that families like yours are often victimized with little follow up from authorities. So this could be your mother's reasoning...or maybe she's just overprotective because she loves you so much.

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  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    anything is possible

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  • 6 months ago

    Sounds like it. Best to talk seriously to your mother about it. She has 'been there, done that' and knows all about the hardships you might have to face (quite unfairly) through racial prejudice. She's the best person to talk to. She'll be overprotective because she's your mother but it's likely she's extra protective for the reasons you have given. Ask her. You can't have a better friend or advisor than your mother.

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  • Blearg
    Lv 5
    6 months ago

    Mothers often try to protect us from things they are afraid to name. I think naming it is better, with the context of generations of history. I can't tell you about what your mother has seen, heard, or experienced herself, but I do know that dangers really do exist. You need to live for yourself, of course! But recognise that most behaviors, however extreme or nonsensical they may seem, have roots in the tangible. And tangible dangers are worth learning about and trying to manage, if you can.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    I've read your post.

    And I think what you're actually doing is trying to embrace and familiarize yourself with the term and concept of aboriginal.

    Because honestly otherwise as your question was stated it makes less sense. This post of yours is just you wanting to talk about yourself. Maybe you're proud of yourself for having learned a new word and this is your way of wanting to show it. Who knows. I just know your question isn't what you're asking.

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