Is it okay to do veterinary procedures on your own pet, if you aren't a veterinarian?

My dog has a very large cyst. It will be very expensive to get a very invasive procedure done, by a specialist veterinarian. I can't even afford a consultation with a specialist veterinarian. My dad, a radiologist for humans, has offered to do a procedure on my dog which they do on humans who have cysts. This procedure is relatively safe, and easy.

The traditional procedure would involve removing the entire cyst physically. This procedure that my dad offered involves pulling out the cyst fluid, and injecting the cyst with tetracycline, which destroys the lining of the cyst, and then the cyst shrinks down on its own.

If I could afford it, I would go to the specialist vet, and ask if this is a procedure they could do. They might say they've never heard of it, or they might say that have. They might say they'd be willing to try it, or they might insist on doing the more invasive traditional procedure. Either way, I would have to pay a couple hundred bucks just to be seen, and then an ungodly amount of money for the actual operation. Meanwhile my dad can do this other, "safer," procedure for free.

My current plan, before my dad offered to do this, was to leave it alone and let my dog live with it for the rest of her life. My dads offer is very tempting. It also seems slightly unethical. In a way, it could be more ethical than any other option. How ill advised would it be to let my dad do a veterinary procedure on my dog?

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  • 6 months ago

    My prior dog which was a purebred Maltese and lived to be 16 years old had a large sebaceous cyst filled with fluid that the vet drained and biopsied the fluid. I am sure your Father could handle the procedure just fine, it is the issue of no biopsy. Yes, it does cost a couple of hundred dollars to see the vet and have the procedure done! It has to be what you are comfortable with as a pet parent! I wish you luck!

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  • 6 months ago

    While many treatments between dogs and humans are similar, they are very rarely the same. As stated previously, there's only one way to tell if it is a cyst and not some other form of growth, benign or malignant. You would need a biopsy. Many veterinarians will all you to make payments over time. Especially if you are familiar with them. Contact the vet you go to for your vaccinations and such, and see if they are able to help. Avoid any humans medications for your dog, as often, dogs can have severe reactions to medications which are routinely used by humans. That's why Tylenol is deadly to dogs.

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  • Ocimom
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    If your father does anything to the dog and the dog has complications or dies, then its on your consicence the rest of your life - don't come crying to us.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Is it okay for me to slap you upside the head multiple times a day?

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  • 6 months ago

    Radiologists make good $$, so ask him for cash.

    In meantime, here s coupon for FREE pet exam!

    https://vcahospitals.com/free-pet-exam (to the person who neutered dog @ home: bad idea; dog could have died from botched job)

    Are u sure it's a cyst, or tumor? Resist urge to pop it, which causes inflammation! If it pops by itself, need MEDS to prevent infection! https://www.petful.com/pet-health/need-know-skin-c...

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  • 6 months ago

    When you live out in the middle of nowhere, you have to be your own vet. If you aren't up to date on some procedures your stock would suffer.

    Never heard about injecting tetracycline but it makes sense to me. I think I would give it a try. Sounds easy enough. good luck.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Yes. I neutered my basset hound puppy at home. He barely survived the procedure, but I saved a ton of money.

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  • *****
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    It is very much illegal to practice veterinary medicine without a license. He could get in a heap of trouble, and so could you, for allowing it. I'd guess he'd even be putting his own medical license at risk.

    Additionally, unless this mass has been biopsied, you have no way of knowing that it's a cyst. One of my dogs I was told emphatically had a "cyst". The vet I saw refused to remove it, said I'd be cruel to put her through even a biopsy and that she "knew what a cyst looked like". A few months later, I'd changed vets and booked her to have it biopsied and removed. By that point, it had progressed to a stage 3 malignant mast cell tumor. Sure would have been a lot better if it had been removed when I first noticed it. Vets (and doctors) CAN NOT conclusively diagnose a cyst without biopsy. Several other things can look and feel EXACTLY like a cyst in dogs. Surely your radiologist dad can afford to lend you the money to have your dog properly examined and treated by a veterinarian?

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  • 6 months ago

    You said your dad is a radiologist. As in a medical doctor. One I guess who has reached consultant level.

    If that's true, I personally wouldn't hesitate to let him treat a cyst the way you've described.

    But it does raise another question. If your dad was a radiologist in the UK he would be earning around £100,000 per annum (about $150,000). So instead of him going to all this bother to bring syringes, needles and prescription antibiotics home from his job; why not simply ask him to give you a couple of hundred dollars so you can see a vet?

    You did begin by saying affordability was the obstacle.

    I'm sorry for some of the answers you've received. The people who use RANDOM capital letters are all the same person in actual fact. With serious health issues. Try to simply ignore her. She'll attack me in the comments too, but I don't mind. I think it's somehow cathartic for her.

    Source(s): able to type without RANDOM capital letters to make myself feel important.
  • 6 months ago

    No, it's not. You would likely make things worse and KILL your dog. This could be something as simple as a sebaceous since or something as fatal as cancer. When a cyst is cut into ore removed antibiotics are also prescribed to the dog to prevent infection. PRESCRIPTION - meaning you HAVE to go to a vet.

    This cyst needs to be BIOPSIED and looked at by a vet to see what is. COMPLETE BS that any vet charges "a couple hundred dollars just to be seen". They charge $20 to $75 for office visits.

    If you can't afford an office visit and a biopsy then you have NO business being a pet owner. Give this neglected dog up to a no-kill shelter.

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