Can I hire a lawyer for friend who signed a NDA?

Hey, I know I probably need to contact a lawyer for this and I will but maybe someone on here knows. I had a friend who signed an NDA/confidentiality agreement. Come to find out, she hired a private investigator on me to find out info that wasn’t her business. Isn’t this a breach of contract since a PI is a third party? There was nothing illegal going on. That’s a confidential breach I would think.

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  • 10 months ago

    Does your contract state that she cannot hire a PI for any purpose? To really get a better idea of what happened here, one would need to read your contract, and then determine whether there was a breach. I have no idea what the contract stated, other than spoke of some sort of confidentiality.

    Source(s): Certified Paralegal, with 25+ years' experience.
    • It says to not provide any information to a third party. A PI isn’t a legal government person. There was no reason to open an investigation.

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  • xyzzy
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    It sounds like you and a friend signed what you are calling a NDA. An NDA is a legal document that establish contractual conditions for the exchange of information where a disclosing party shares confidential information with a receiving party. The NDA defines information that the parties wish to protect from dissemination and outlines restrictions on use.

    Many types of information are exchanged under an NDA: ideas, know-how, process descriptions, chemical formulas, manufacturing processes, IP licensing and development, research and financial information. Depending on which party is disclosing information, NDAs may be “one-way” with one party disclosing information and one party receiving, or “two-way” when there is a mutual disclosure.

    Personal information is generally not covered by a NDA and public records are never covered by an NDA.

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  • 10 months ago

    There's a lot more to this than you are letting on here I am sure, but no one is stopping you from engaging a lawyer.

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  • 10 months ago

    That depends on the specifics of the NDA.

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  • 10 months ago

    You can hire anyone you like but a non-disclosure agreement doesn't prevent people from finding out more information, it prevents them from telling anyone. Plus employers who require their employees to sign NDA's typically do thorough background checks on them too. As for any actual breach, that would depend on the contract, and because you aren't offering it, it is impossible to say whether or not a breach has occurred.

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    • linkus86
      Lv 7
      10 months agoReport

      Not necessarily. And to sue her for the breach you would need to prove she shared the info with the PI, not rely on a generalization that such information is required to investigate. Also timing is key as the PI could have been hired before signing the NDA.

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  • Anonymous
    10 months ago

    Unlikely on your stated grounds.

    But, you might have an Invasion of Privacy case,

    You need an attorney to cover the specifics, Like She is not "disclosing" related anything, the Investigator is gathering the information.

    • She disclosed our names and information about us to the PI for them to investigate. My husband is a celebrity, so it puts him at risk.

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  • 10 months ago

    The employer made you sign an NDA, then hired an investigator?

    This is legal and legitimate.

    If you read the NDA, you would know what it means

    • I’m the employer who made a FRIEND sign a NDA. She hired the PI on me after she signed the documentation.

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