In Solar system, we have Rocky planets as inner planets and Gas Giants are outer ones. Is it similar in other star systems too?

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  • 6 months ago
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    What we know now is that the planets in our solar system did not all form in the regions from the Sun that they currently are in.

    Jupiter, long settled in its position as the fifth planet from our sun, was a rolling stone in its youth. Over the eons, the giant planet roamed toward the center of the solar system and back out again, at one point moving in about as close as Mars is now. The planet's travels profoundly influenced the solar system, changing the nature of the asteroid belt and making Mars smaller than it should have been. These details are based on a new model of the early solar system developed by an international team that includes NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

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  • 6 months ago

    No. It's just a coincidence.

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  • 6 months ago

    In a Normal System like ours it is quite possible

    But not every Star System is normal

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  • 6 months ago

    No... we've seen a wide variety of planetary arrangements - including one that has a gas giant as the closest planet, followed by a rocky world, then another gas giant, another rocky world, and the last world detected is a gas giant... when asked to explain how this might've happened, one of the Kepler analysts said, "It looks like God dropped his marbles..."

    There's another system where a gas giant as big or bigger than Jupiter has a comet-like orbit, coming in very close to the star at very high speed, then moves very far out before falling back in again.

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  • 6 months ago

    No. In other star systems there are often "hot Jupiters" near the stars, which are gaseous planets which orbit so close to their primaries that much of what would be rock on this planet is vapourised by the heat. There are some star systems like ours though.

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  • 6 months ago

    We simply don't know for the vast distances to other solar systems.

    What is known, is solar systems are quite random and unique in their beginnings, so generalizing based on our own system is being too narrow minded to be scientific fact.

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  • 6 months ago

    No. Many planetary systems have hot Jupiters amazingly close to the star. The planets in our Solar System have moved have moved. The terrestrial planets may be second generation planets.

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  • Elaine
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    So far it seems that each solar system is unique. Some stars have gas giants orbiting so close to their sun that they are given the name "Hot Jupiters". Then there are the "Hot Neptunes". Some stars appear to have only one or two planets.

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