Anonymous
Anonymous asked in PetsDogs · 6 months ago

How many calories of fat and protein do dogs need per pound of body weight?

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  • 6 months ago

    This really does depend on the type of dog (breed?), age, and whether he has a job or not.

    I know, first-hand, the results of a puppy of my main breed being fed a well-known product which has 32% protein (I don't know about fat) which clearly causes too much growth too fast which in turn runs to structural development problems, or can. With our litters, I'd use something no higher than 28% protein, coupled with the slow-maturing line I had which for some, might have been frustrating in terms of taking a flyer into the ring at 6 months. Trouble is those puppies rarely make adulthood without 'falling apart'.

    I have NEVER looked at feeding my hounds based on what you are asking. I just found a good quality non cereal-based food, with a reasonable protein level, dropping to around 24% max as an adult. And I exercised sensibly through the first year so my puppies remained sound into adulthood.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    A lot depends on age, breed, and activity of the dog. Dogs that are walking and working all day long, very active and rarely get a chance to lay and relax take a lot more calories than a dog that just lay is around all day long or runs around at their leisure.

    Pups need a different calorie count than an adult dog, seniors need different food vs a pregnant female. It all d p nds.

    You can ask the vet what they put your dog at for calorie count, but the absolute best guide to hoe your dogs doing is to look and feel their bodied.

    Are they chubby and have no tuck at their flanks is or underside. Can you feel fat rolls under their skin, are they out of breath just at a walk? Can you see the heir whole spine bone for bone, or see the bones in their tail?

    Besides calorie count and activity, every dog had a similar but different metabolism, what be good for one littermate may not work on its sibling for instance, it may be more active or it’s body may be more efficient in burning the food etc. by feeding the two dogs the exact amount of food daily one may gain weight while the other looses.

    As Jojo posted look at your dog, feel your dog, you should be able to feel the muscles, see the ribs barely through the coat and the dog should look fit. Look up obesity chart for dogs to see the different body types.

    Your vet can point you in the right direction but it’s up to you to fine tune the amounts, more food if the dogs getting too thin. Less if it’s getting fat.

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  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Calories used will depend on what your dog does, if it is just a pet that gets the occassional walk, or is walked daily or a dog you do agility/flyball with or a dog that works, herds sheep, police or customs rescue/search dog all use different amouonts of calories........ raw diets need careful planning and consist of meat, organs, veg, fruit and limited amounts of fat and you need to do lots of research before you feed raw designing the diet to suit the individual dog and/or a professional animal nutritionist to advise you ( and that is NOT the vet, they are NOT trained/qualified animal nutritionists)

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  • Jojo
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    I have never bothered with stuff like that in all my 56 years of dog ownership.

    Just feed a dog a good quality kibble or a diet you know contains all the vitamins and minerals it needs, and the dog will be just fine.

    The outward appearance and condition of a dogs stools and its general take on life should convey to an owner if the dog is healthy or not. Jmo.

    • Verulam 1
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      ^^ Me either!

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  • 6 months ago

    I don't know the exact answer. Better you can ask a veterinary doctor.

    • Verulam 1
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      It would be very rare for every vet to know about every breed/type of dog. Better to ask THE BREEDER!!

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