How do they get that foamy top on the beer?

Update:

to be honest I am not much of a beer drinker, but I do like the foamy top, but most times there is hardly any foam or it collapses very quickly.

How can I get more foam, what do I ask for?

What is the maximum foam is it 100% or can it be higher?

If they had an all foam beer I would drink it more often

6 Answers

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  • james
    Lv 7
    8 months ago
    Favourite answer

    You order a San Magale light. Shake once pop open the can & drink the foam. Once that foam is gone take a drink or two. Then slap the bottom of the can down on the table. This will give you more foam. repeat several times. Then add salt for more foam. Throw last 1/4th can of beer away.

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  • 8 months ago

    The head is there so they can sell you air instead of beer.

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  • oikoσ
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    As in soda, the dissolved carbon dioxide is released when the liquid is poured, less if the pour is gentle, more if the more if the pour is rougher. Unlike soda, beer has protein in it, which helps to retain the foam. BTW, greasy glasses reduce the "head".

    Update: The other day, I scrambled some eggs in a bowl, then sprayed water into the bowl to keep the egg from drying there. The foam lasted for hours because of the protein in the albumin. You can buy overpriced albumin to add to your cocktails if you want them with foam on top. It might work with your beer, too.

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  • 8 months ago

    It's natural and has to do with the yeast, sugars, and alcohol reducing the surface tension. When beer is poured the dissolved gas (mostly CO2 from the yeast turning sugars into alcohol) forms bubbles and because of the reduced surface tension, they don't all pop.

    Some brewers also add Nitrogen gas to their beers either at POS or using widgets in cans, it makes the bubbles smaller, smoother, and creamier. But you don't want to add it too early due to it's reactive nature!

    • DCM5150
      Lv 7
      8 months agoReport

      Close - nitrogen gas is pretty inert (it does not have reactive nature). And it is not the reduced surface tension that allows bubbles (that actually reduces bubbles) but the things in beer such as protein and their structure that hold the bubbles together.

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  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    It is called fermented yeast. When they use yeast to ferment the stuff with it caused that effect

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  • 8 months ago

    they pour is too fast

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