Is this sentence grammatically correct?

John was a great teacher, whose students loved him, and he is still a very knowledgeable person.

5 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    "whose students loved" not "whose students loved him" because whose is already referring to him making it verbose.

    Edit: On second thought, I might be mistaken because whose refers to him but the action of 'loved him' is not covered by the term. My example could make it mean "the students loved" ambiguously. So maybe the him there is not so bad after all.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    It is okay............

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  • 6 months ago

    take out the comma between teacher and whose.

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  • Nancy
    Lv 6
    6 months ago

    No, it's not. The non restrictive clause "whose students loved him" must immediately follow "John," as follows:

    John, whose students loved him, was a great teacher, and he is still a very knowledgeable person.

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    • Me6 months agoReport

      I was just trying to figure out the rule re. whose and where it goes. My unintelligible comment was correcting myself, as I think it should be 'The greatest teacher in the world, whose students loved him, was John' - but it's a terrible sentence, regardless. Anyway, thanks for your help!

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  • 6 months ago

    No grammar troll, it’s not.

    Reported. Again.

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