Marc asked in HealthDiet & Fitness · 5 months ago

Why does information about nutrition and supplements vary so much?

6 Answers

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  • 5 months ago

    different companies different opinions

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  • LP7
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    depends what company is promoting it.

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  • 5 months ago

    You don't know what question to ask. What is "good" or "healthy?" What amount of protein from what source do you need to get maximum muscle mass? That I have an answer for. What's the best shake? well kinda sorta... if maybe, ya know...

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  • Logan
    Lv 5
    5 months ago

    Marketers telling us what we want to hear.

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  • 5 months ago

    Nutrition "experts" have been making up stories for years. In the 70's i think it was, there was a man who had no degree in medicine whatsoever, he decided cholesterol and saturated fats caused heart disease. This has been disproved. You can look up David Diamond on YouTube to see his talks on the subject.

    Nutrition "experts" have been telling diabetics to eat pasta, grains, rice, to eat fruit an drink fruit juices and other high carb and sugary foods for years. Really? All of this stuff spikes their insulin levels and makes it worse. They are also told to eat 50 grams of carbs per meal. This is a great way for pill pushing manufacturers to make gobs of money -- having doctors make people sicker.

    The natural human diet is meats and vegetables and "natural" fats.... which include saturated fats. People were eating this way for thousands and thousands of years. Then processed foods and refined sugars came along. Suddenly people started having heart disease at a huge rate.

    As far as supplements go, it's probably a good idea for a person to have a blood work up once in a while just to make sure they aren't deficient. I take magnesium citrate, potassium citrate, K2, D vitamins and C0Q10.

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    • Pippin
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      The only concrete number I'm seeing looking at reliable medical websites is 50-80 grams per DAY -- not per meal.

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    There’s no straight answer to this. It could be:

    money - for example, youtubers lie about their protein supplements so that viewers will buy them

    people pretending to know what they are talking about

    people pretending to be natural; when they’ve been doing steroids for years.

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