Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 6 months ago

Where did the asteroids that killed the dinosaurs come from?

Update:

did any asteroids hit the moon?

24 Answers

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  • 6 months ago

    It's unknown, but the most likely place is the asteroid belt. Currently, dozens of 'Near Earth Objects' cross our orbit year to year; it could have been one of those, and it was at the right place at the right time. It's estimated speed (30 to 50,000 mph) indicates it was within the orbit of Jupiter, but it's possible it may have come from further out.

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  • 6 months ago

    Most likely, Jupiter's gravity nudged an asteroid out of its orbit in the asteroid belt. It went in a chaotic orbit around the sun for millions of years before intersecting earth's orbit.

    • Bulldog redux
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      But that errant Jupiter was about 3.8 billion years ago. The dinosaurs went extinct a relatively short time ago, only 66 million years.

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  • 6 months ago

    Somewhere out there, possibly from the outer belts.

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  • 6 months ago

    it may have come from outer space, or a large part of earth got blown into space from a volcano.

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  • 6 months ago

    The dinosaurs were killed by a single asteroid, probably one from either the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter or from the Kuiper Belt beyond the orbit of Neptune.

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  • 6 months ago

    Back some 60 million years and before, the solar system was still developing and there were just billions of rocks and dirty ice balls just in some orbit around the sun, not counting the billions that came from outside.

    All this time passes and many were cleaned away by the planets, Moons,Earth, and the sun, so that now, only a few hundred resident asteroids and comets remain.

    Now nobody knows for certain where this 7 mile wide rock came from, we only know the direction of impact and the massive energy it packed. Seems there have been other similar impacts on earth in far history.

    Back then, raining rocks was probably common. Even today, the earth gets pelted by small rocks that don't incinerate in the atmosphere, maybe on a daily basis. Too small to do much damage, a couple people have been hit resulting in injury, coming through the roof of houses, denting cars fairly good.

    Yep, you look at the moon, a great many of the craters were from meteorite or small comet strikes, millions.

    With no atmosphere, earth would hardly look different. There are 128 significant craters on Earth today, they are quite a sight and you might visit one. I have seen the Arizona crater near Winslow, and WOW, that was some rock.

    Consider, the dino killer hit long before humans ever walked earth.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    From space.........................

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  • 6 months ago

    Somewhere in the Asteroid Belt, there had been an Asteroid that they have named Baptistina

    It had been broken up, probably from a massive collision and the pieces became therefore Baptistinoids

    The Dinosaur killer 65 Million years ago was one of them

    The Moon Crater, Tycho, about the same age was another Baptistinoid Impact

    This is however conjecture as some would say

    But then Again nobody was here to see the Theia collision

    Attachment image
    Source(s): Theia
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  • 6 months ago

    There was only one, and it came from somewhere in the solar system.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    be thankful those asteroids killed off the no brain reptiles

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