Black asked in Science & MathematicsPhysics · 6 months ago

If we were to ever discover a quantum theory of gravity?

Would that imply that gravity could interfere with itself if we sent it through a double slit?

Update:

Or maybe more appropriately said, could we get gravity to interfere with itself similar to how the double-slit experiment works for other particles?

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  • neb
    Lv 7
    6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    If the quantum gravity is mediated by the hypothetical massless spin 2 graviton, it would in theory behave as other particles. If there are two paths available for a given particle, there will be a superposition of the wave function of each path.

    In practice, ain’t gonna happen. The energy of a single graviton is so small, it’s wavelength will be enormous. Not only would you not be able to create the double slit experiment, you wouldn’t be able to generate a single graviton, and you wouldn’t be able to detect it.

    There is also a reasonable chance that a quantum gravity theory won’t conform to a particle view. Spacetime as we know and love it may be quantized with no exchange particle.

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    • neb
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      Of course they can have spin. Photons and gluons are both massless and have spin 1.

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  • 6 months ago

    What do you mean by sending gravity thru a double slit? All particles interfere with themselves. A graviton will interfere with itself too.

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  • Bill
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    To test that, you'd have to find a material that blocks gravity so you could make a double slit.

    • Black6 months agoReport

      Or maybe two gravitational wave sources interfering with each other?

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  • Not
    Lv 4
    6 months ago

    Maybe this is what you are looking for:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_field_theory

    • Black6 months agoReport

      Not really, Quantum Field Theory doesn't include gravity, though it does include Special Relativity.

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  • 6 months ago

    no

    ..........................

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