How to save seeds for next year's tomatoes?

I am a first time gardener who produced a bounty of wonderful tomatoes that made me very popular amongst family and neighbors. But I grew my tomatoes from plants I got at the hardware store. Next year I want to grow my own from seed, but don't know how to preserve the seeds until next spring.

I saw a video of a guy who sliced up a tomato and planted each slice into a little pots, which sounds like a great way of doing so before putting them in the ground, but will the seeds be viable if I freeze my tomatoes I have now? And if not, what are other methods?

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  • 9 months ago
    Favourite answer

    If your tomatoes were a hybrid, your plants next year may or may not be the same type of tomato if you plant the seeds from these tomatoes:

    https://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/...

    That said, what I have done is just dry the seeds on a paper towel, and then put them in an envelope for next year, marked with what kind they are.

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    • natural
      Lv 5
      9 months agoReport

      Yeah the tomatoes you get won’t be better boy when you plant them because it’s a hybrid. It would be better to buy new seeds next year. Try Cherokee Purple next time. It’s an easy productive tasty heirloom. Homegrown heirloom tomato flavor will blow your mind. And you can save their seeds.

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  • Mr.357
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    If the variety is hybrid, there is no use to save seeds. If you save seeds, let them air dry. Do not seal them up in any container as the seeds will mold/rot if they are not dry.

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  • John P
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    Not really worth trying to save tomato seeds. Buy a packet of seeds next spring. But frankly, if you have a good local supply of plants, buy them as plants.

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    It's unlikely you will get good results from saving seeds as they will not be true to type. Seeds are not expensive so it's rather pointless.

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  • gerald
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    you can buy packs of seeds for very little they are much more reliable you can research other types plum giant beef small cherry ones great in salads expand your interest there is no need to go over the top but challenge yourself its what gardening is all about its about eliminating mistakes that destroy your year

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  • 9 months ago

    When it’s time to harvest the tomatoes, save some that aren’t ripe, or are inferior to the rest, and seed them by slicing. Dry them, and store in a sealed jar to start them over the winter season to sprout, then transplant. If you want more of a seed yield, you’ll have to sacrifice some of your tomatoes to use for seed. These can be used to make sauce, or chopped and canned or frozen.

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  • Brian
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    Scoop out a tomato, and put the seed mass on a paper towel to dry. Keep the seeds dry until planting.

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  • 9 months ago

    You squeeze a good number of seeds with their jelly-like coverings into a small container, put in some water, and let them ferment a few days, until the jelly-like substance has been dissolved. Then you pick out the seeds and lay them on a paper towel, and let them dry. If you can, you place them evenly on the towel so they can be cut into neat little squares with one seed on each piece. When they are dry, you can roll up that paper towel (don't cut them into squares until you are ready to plant them next year) and place it in a cool, dark, dry place, like a storage room, or a box on a shelf, in a place that doesn't freeze in the winter. Next spring you cut up the squares and plant each square in it's own pot, water and set it in the sunshine. You don't need to tear the seed off the paper towel, as it might damage the seed. But like JoyaSee said, if your tomatoes were hybrids (check the label off the pot you planted from the hardware store), they likely won't be as good. It's all about genetics. That's why heirloom varieties work better. But if you know what variety you bought from the store, you can look for seed packets in the stores. Atwoods usually has a superb collection in the spring. I often pick up seeds on sale in the fall when the stores are clearing out their garden sections. Placing them in a box in a cook closet will keep them nicely until next year.

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