Could it be dangerous to use a rag that previously was used for bleach to dust using alcohol?

Me and my boyfriend are having a bad argument. I purchased some white wash cloths for the purpose of using them to clean surfaces in the house with diluted bleach after cooking and cleaning. I use them almost everyday then hang them up to dry.

This morning he asked me “are these clean?” I was busy and then answered “depends on what you’re using it for”. I then noticed that he was dusting surfaces using alcohol. I got upset and told him to toss the rag because bleach+alcohol=chloroform. He says I’m stupid and overreacting. He claims to have washed it before using it but I doubt it. Am I overreacting or is this a real possibility that he released harmful fumes into the house? What would you think? Would you be concerned?

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  • 2 months ago
    Best answer

    I wouldn’t be concerned because the amount produced is insignificant. You did say it was diluted so there’s not as much bleach to reach with the alcohol. I also assume that it was drying overnight so most of the bleach and water would have evaporated.

    When I was in college doing experiments, we all sniffed a lot more chloroform that you would have sniffed. When I’m isolating DNA, I’m doing hundreds of samples at a time. It might be only 100 ul per sample but multiply that by hundreds and it adds up.

    Chloroform isn’t as dangerous as cyanide gas.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    if you use a rag for your vag then you are in for a bad hag.

  • 2 months ago

    You are overreacting.

  • 2 months ago

    when bleach dries, it becomes inert. You could eat those washclothes and be perfectly safe...well except for the fact that cloth doesn't digest.

    AND who in the hell dusts with alcohol????

    You both sound nuts. AND completely germaphobic.

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  • 2 months ago

    Friend if you have washed the rag out from the bleach no danger for making chloroform. There's a slight danger that there's still a few crystals of sodium hypochlorite in the rag. And if that was the case I'd be more concerned with the chance of causing spontaneous ignition. Although the chance of that is very slight. Any person that has ever purchased chlorinated brake parts cleaner from the auto parts store for $3 has used chloroform. It's not that deadly! It's only deadly if you deliberately concentrate and inhale it for a long. Of time. The little bit that you get off a rag from bleach and alcohol. Isn't going to hurt you.

    Pay more attention to using linseed oil or furniture polish on a rag. I did that and tossed the rag in the. Almost burned my living room down! It's spontaneously combusted a few hours later.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Bleach is unstable and dissipates rapidly in air. So I doubt a problem would occur. But why don't you, and he, use separate cloths just to be sure?

  • marty
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    No danger, bleach evaporates quickly so there wouldn't be anything left on the rags. You're both wrong for using bleach and alcohol to dust with, both of those are harmful to most surfaces.

  • Eva
    Lv 4
    2 months ago

    Over-reacting. If you mixed your cleaning solutions properly and rinsed the cloths after using, there isn't enough bleach remaining to cause a problem. The cautions about mixing have more to do with leaving the bleach solution in the toilet bowl or sink and adding other cleaning products.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Can you smell any bleach on the rags? I'm voting for overreacting but you were there.

  • 2 months ago

    It's not an issue at all. Where do these ideas come from.

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