Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureEtiquette · 8 months ago

How do you call out LYING customers while remaining professional?

Something I notice while working in customer service--whether it be as a cashier, a CS agent on the phone, a salesperson--you will constantly get people either trying to get something for free or flat out trying to rip the company off.

The ones that burn me up the most are the people at the register who say "Hey, I gave you a $20!" when you know damn well they gave you a $10--I had someone hold up a line of about 20 people smack in the middle of lunch hour after she aggresively insisted she gave me a $100, and I had to go get the manager and take the till to the office to balance it just to make sure I hadn't completely zoned out. Unsurprisingly when we came back, she was gone--I wanted to cave her head in.

Now working as a CS rep on the phone, I constantly get people fabricating stories because they don't realize we log and make notes on ALL calls, and that we can see that they called previously and gave another agent a different story. Or they make up a story about an agent promising something while unaware of how our protocols work as well as what we are and aren't authorized to do.

It seriously gets me hot to where I want to call their bullshìt out right there....obviously I can't, or I'd be out of a job though. How do you professionally let someone know that they are lying and you aren't buying it? It's an insult to the intelligence!

4 Answers

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  • Jerry
    Lv 7
    8 months ago
    Favourite answer

    If you have a professional attitude rather than taking this stuff personally then you just accept that dealing graciously and courteously with people who lie, cheat, bully, steal, and otherwise are unpleasant, obnoxious, repellent, or even downright wicked.

    "There must be some misunderstanding. According to our records .... "

    Along with that, keep in mind that your role as CSR, sales person, or cashier is to stay within the rules while not offending or alienating the customer. Do what you can to give the customer a good outcome, an outcome he/she likes, even when you find that customer despicable. If you can make the customer happy with some small perk or concession, then do that no matter how much the customer has lied and tried to cheat. "I'm so sorry you've had this unpleasant experience. I apologize on behalf of my employer and our entire staff. May I send you a coupon for $5 off your next purchase of $50 or more?"

    And of course with some repeat offenders you have to draw the line and give up trying to please a customer for whom nothing will ever be enough. Leave it to your supervisors to tell serial abusers and cheats that their game isn't going to fly anymore.

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  • 8 months ago

    "Sir/ma'am. With all due respect, you have been misunderstood about the nature of our business. We're not going to stop you from serial lying but we would advise if you demand, we would present you with one of the appropriate records based on your purchase over the phone just to clairify how much you paid. I hope you'll understand in the near future".

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  • Cara
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    Here we usually have a little clip by the till that holds the £10 or £20 the customer has handed over; this remains on display while the change is counted out, so the customer cannot possibly say they gave a larger amount. Why don't you do something similar? Keep their paper money out of the till until you've settled with them.

    • Jerry
      Lv 7
      8 months agoReport

      This is how I learned to make change back before customers were expected to quickly do the math in heads so as to know whether or not "eleven forty two is your change" is correct, when instead the cashier counted out the difference to DEMONSTRATE to customers that their change was correct.

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  • Matt
    Lv 5
    8 months ago

    "Sir/ma'am, you seem to misunderstand outlr buisness...." being direct with acusations of lying might backfire

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