What is mean by Electronic transformer?

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  • Steven
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    The expression implies a signal transformer or a high frequency switch mode transformer instead of a 50/60Hz power transformer, but the expression "electronic transformer" is not an well established precise meaning. Many modern electronic devices use ferrite core transformers but laminated core signal transformers have been used since vacuum tube electronics, and in analog telephone systems.

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  • Who
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    its a misnomer - cos it implies its based on the same principle as a normal transformer - it dont

    there are 2 ways of converting mains supply to another voltage

    1) a normal transformer - but they are quite lossy - you put a lot more power "in" than you get "out"

    2) switch mode

    these basically take mains power rectify it to dc and use it to charge a capacitor

    BUT the supply to the capacitor is switched on/off at high speed so that the capacitor is only charged up to the output (dc) you want

    this requires electronics in order to work

    the big benefit of switch mode is that since the electronics takes very power they are very efficient - ie most of the power you put in is available as output power

    the drawback is that the capacitor must be of special type cos it will be subject to a virtually constant voltage but a lot of ripple on it - far more than with a transformer

    (getting technical - the can also generate a lot of electrical interference on the mains supply and RF noise (cos of the high frequency)

    so Its LIKE a transformer cos its producing a different voltage from the input AND its electronic, but is not a "transformer)

    (and since a normal transformer is basically a big inductor its no use at ALL pumping a voltage into it at high frequency cos a) all you will produce it a lot of heat and b) you will get very little output from it)

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  • Bob
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    The electronic transformer is similar to an ordinary transformer with the following exceptions.

    The laminated iron core is replaced with a dust ferrite core which gives less iron loss.

    The primary and secondary windings have fewer turns

    The AC supply to the transformer is derived from a high frequency oscillator.

    Using high frequency means that the transformer can be smaller than a 50 or 60Hz device, their is no low power factor on low loading and the electronic circuit used as the input oscillator can be made to automatically accept any mains voltage applied between around 90 and 250V.

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  • 8 months ago

    Electronic Transformer used  in SMPS circuits  so called , Its core made of fer rite solid core.Normally high frequency are used thats why the size is so small.No of turns also very less  proportions  in order of primary & Secondary .In some cases It may called also a Pulse transformer.

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  • 8 months ago

    I'm not sure.

    An Electrical transformer uses two or more coils in a mutual magnetic field to change voltages/current., or provide an isolated power source at same voltage. Autotransformers maintain steady output voltage despite input fluctuations. . Many use Si steel laminated cores, higher frequencies use ferrite.

    An Electronic transformer might be an Electronic Ballast; it uses solid state devices to kick line frequency up to 25KC so the back EMF of a single winding choke can be used to transform voltage/current. Or, the hi frequency allows a light, ferrite cored transformer and fewer windings to save manufacturing/copper costs/ weight/size. . Copper magnet wire is getting expensive, so is winding a transformer or motor. . Many ballasts for fluorescents and Neon tubes are now electronic. Some hi voltage electronic ballasts use only voltage multipliers, no wires at all. So in some cases an electronic"transformer" is a misnomer although output is same.

    .I tried to fix a microwave oven the other day that used an ":electronic transformer". * Many later TV sets, before flat screens, derived all the operating voltages off the flyback, which ran at 15, 750 Hz. This saved cost of iron core transformer, but put more strain on HO transistor. If your 1980 Zenith quits, probably that big transistor in heatsink near flyback.

    Source(s): Fixed 25Kc switching power supplies professionally 8 years; Tesla Coil and other hi voltage projects. * The microwave had a bad control board, hi voltage inverter wouldn't come on. Cant get parts or schematics for C/Bs, a new board is $45-$60, new microwave only $60.
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  • 8 months ago

    USING COMPLEX ELECTRONIC CIRCUIT TO REPLACE LARGE SIZE TRANSFORMER EXISTS DC POWER SUPPLY. COMPUTER POWER SUPPLY IS THE TOPICAL EXAMPLE , A SMALL BOX SIZE AND LIGHT WEIGHT SUCH DEVICE IS ABLE TO PROVIDE 5Vdc 40A WHEREAS A SIMPLE 60C/S STEP DOWN TRANSFORMER PROVIDES THE SAME CURRENT IS VERY BIG AND HEAVY.

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  • 8 months ago
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  • Mark
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    An ELECTRIC transformer is a device the changes AC voltage to another AC voltage. An ELECTRONIC transformer is that, but can automatically detect what is going in. Common devices that have these are laptop chargers and phone chargers. (You can use them on 100 V, 120 V, 220-240 V.)

  • 8 months ago

    A transformer is an apparatus that converts one level of voltage to another through electromagnetism

    • Anon8 months agoReport

      Many transformers are isolation; output voltage same as input. Ballasts for quartz-halogens are auto transformer; output same no matter what line is. And, it'ss wound for the nominal line voltage output; so 1:1 ratio at nominal voltage input.

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