Feminists, do you have thoughts (or better yet, data) on gender differences regarding work that is uncomfortable and/or dangerous?

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Like prostitution? I doubt you care how dangerous and uncomfortable that it is for women.

    I'm not sure exactly what you're asking. Dangerous jobs have been done by women since the dawn of time. If there IS a biological need of carrying 250lbs on your back during a job, yes I think it's fair that a 5'1" woman not get the job. Some of these limits are real (physical not mental), many of them are not. Men have always told lies about their own superiority. These physical limits never get applied to jobs where female bodies are better suited (like pilots, astronauts, deep sea diving). If they were based on actual scientific evidence and went both ways, I'd support it, just like I support sex segregation in sports.

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  • 5 months ago

    No data, but I do have some thoughts.

    1. Some dangerous and/or uncomfortable jobs are done primarily by men because it's primarily men who actually *can* do them. A lot of them require, well, rather more physical strength than the average woman possesses (honestly, more physical strength than the average man, too, but a lot more men than women are strong enough to do them)

    2. Sometimes there is a culture of machismo, and/or some degree of flat-out discrimination, keeping women away from dangerous (and, especially, dangerous but lucrative) jobs, even the ones that they can do perfectly well. If, say, construction has a "boy's club" atmosphere, women, even the ones who can do the job just fine, may feel too uncomfortable on a social and/or personal level to keep working there, and some employers may simply refuse to hire them, either because it's "too dangerous for a girl", or because they think "a girl" couldn't possibly be any good at it.

    3. We tend to think more about conspicuous, large-scale, "manly" danger or unpleasantness than we do about less obvious threats that are just as dangerous, or smaller forms of unpleasantness that are ultimately about as vile. For example, I think one of the jobs with the highest level of on-the-job injuries is chicken processing, and as far as I'm aware that's a job that runs at least close to half female. You may not think of working at a chicken factory as being more dangerous than, say, being a cop, but in terms of per capita injuries, it is (I think). Similarly, while not very many women are, say, sewage workers, plenty are nurses dealing with every bodily fluid that a patient can expel (sometimes directly on them), or daycare workers having to change poopy diapers, or the like.

    In... maybe not my *ideal* world (that one's probably populated by robots that do all the boring stuff, so we only have to do the work we *want* to do, or something), but the world I can reasonably hope we achieve one day, very few professions (if any) will have more than about a 75/25 ratio (either direction) of men to women. And most will be closer to 60/40. That includes both the "high status", safe stuff like CEO or scientist, and the grotty and/or low-level work like sewage workers, secretaries, janitors, and so on. Because, in that optimal world, employers will be asking "Can you, as a specific individual, do this job well", not "Can you, a member of your gender, race, or other category, do this job well?". I think that's more or less what a world that truly had *no* employment discrimination of any kind would look like.

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    It,s a big work one can do and bring successes nothing else.Men are some time times raping dudes!!!First ask,so.I am that who denies them for your sort mainly.

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