If a black hole is an object that compresses all matter to nothing, how is it physically possible?

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Because matter and energy are equivalent, according to another of Einstein's theories, all of the matter inside the black hole are converted to energy, and you can have as much energy in any given volume as you like. Energy doesn't need to occupy any volume, unlike matter does.

    Now there are next-generation theories, beyond quantum physics and relativity that postulate that even energy can't be compressed into infinite density, but the maximum density of energy would still be higher than the maximum density of matter. So whether there is a maximum density or not, black holes can still form, with an event horizon and all, it's just a slight difference about what happens on the inside that changes. In pure General Relativity, it becomes a singularity. In a next-gen theory, it is a high, but not infinite density. Doesn't make a difference to our understanding of black holes from the outside though.

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  • 5 months ago

    Matter is not compressed to nothing. It forms a singularity. It is a point of matter that has 3 properties: mass, charge, and angular momentum. The matter does not disappear. It is still there.

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  • neb
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Given certain energy assumptions, general relativity predicts that all spacetime paths within the event horizon will terminate at a single point - a singularity. It also predicts that at least one component of curvature will approach infinity (more precisely becomes undefined at the center of the black hole). This prediction by general relativity is considered to be a breakdown of the theory and a singularity can’t physically exist.

    There are a couple of ways around this problem, both requiring a modification - or full replacement - of general relativity.

    One possibility is a new quantum gravity theory. Classical general relativity would be replaced by a quantized version that would remain finite at the center of the black hole. Lot of research in this area in string theory and loop quantum gravity. No accepted theory exists yet.

    A second possibility is to keep general relativity as a classical (non quantum) theory, but modify it to introduce spacetime torsion. This is called the Einsten-Cartan theory. A new source of gravity (a new type of stress-energy tensor) is introduced that comes from the quantum spins of particles compressed into a small but finite area. This would give rise to a repulsive gravity that would prevent the singularity from forming. The quantum spins add a twisting (torsion) to spacetime which generates the repulsion. While the repulsive gravity has quantum spins as its source, it is still a classical theory.

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  • 5 months ago

    It is a complicated theory, and not yet fully explained or understood. And I would rather say that a black hole would be a phenomena, not an object. There are many curious theories out there regarding our universe, this is just one of them.

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  • 5 months ago

    A black hole is NOT an object like that. We just plain don't know what happens at the center of a black hole. Gravity physics says one thing, quantum physics says something else. What we actually observe are objects in space that behave just like black holes in general relativity (gravity). But our observations are not precise enough to see the tiny differences (if any) from quantum physics.

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