How did the plague contribute to the end of the Middle Ages?

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  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    By breaking the feudal code which denied opportunity.

  • 3 weeks ago

    Research using the skeletons of people who died in medieval London has clarified conditions that both influenced and were influenced by the Black Death. For example, studies have shown that life expectancy dropped in England prior to the Black Death. Bad health generally results in shorter lives, so declines in life expectancy indicate that growing numbers of people were in poor health before the epidemic. This occurred during a time of growing social inequality and of climate change that resulted in widespread and repeated famines.

    Risk of dying from the Black Death itself was highest for people who were already in poor condition because of pre-existing disease or poor diet. After the epidemic, health appears to have improved, at least for a few generations. This might have occurred because diets and other standards of living got better as a result of dramatically reduced population size. Reduced population size may lead to a favorable balance between people and resources.

    These findings may help us develop and deploy tools that could assist populations facing this type of crisis in the future (or at least provide the motivation to begin development).

  • Nancy
    Lv 6
    3 weeks ago

    The plague ultimately resulted in a glut of resources and even the poorest survivors, people who had previously been homeless, became somewhat wealthy as they could go and take over homes and lands of entire families that had died.  The sudden relief on resources led to a surge of prosperity so great that suddenly the not so massive masses, no longer struggling to survive, could self-actualize, learning to read and so forth.  That brought about the Age of Discovery and the Enlightenment, which marked the end of the Middle Ages, a period defined by its cultural darkness.

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