Where is outer space located and how did outer space become outer space?

I feel like everyone asks "how did Earth come to be?" and questions regarding Earth's existence, but what about outer space? How did space form? Like I'm talking down to the first atom, where did it come from? Space couldn't have just appeared, there had to be "nothingness" first, right? Sorry if this is too deep or whatever but I don't get it. Also where even is space? I get Earth is in space, and galaxies are located IN space but where is space. Is space located within nothingness? If you kept traveling in one direction in space, would you eventually run into the end of space?

So many questions, my bad.

I just want other's opinions on this, I am very open minded.

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  • 4 weeks ago
    Best answer

    >>Where is outer space located and how did outer space become outer space?

    It's a little subjective... when the first astronauts/cosmonauts went into orbit, that was called "outer space."  Today, Earth orbit has become mostly "space", while a trip to the moon may have been considered "outer space."  Now, many engineers who send probes to Mars and beyond call anything beyond the moon 'outer space'...  So - depends on how you want to use it.

    >>I feel like everyone asks "how did Earth come to be?" and 

    >>questions regarding Earth's existence, but what about outer space? 

    >>How did space form? 

    That's a big question... It's believed that our whole universe formed when the Big Bang occurred - and that nothing that we can experience today existed prior to that event. Our "space" started from a tiny point, and rapidly expanded (and is still expanding) to form our universe, with everything we know inside, including space itself.  (And, most physicists refer to it as "space/time", as neither existed before the Big Bang, and now both exist as a single entity together.)

    >>Like I'm talking down to the first atom, where did it come from? 

    When the Big Bang occurred, it expanded from a tiny point, and rapidly grew incredibly large... the heat and energy of this expansion (many compare it to an explosion, which has some merit) was so great, that particles could not exist for a very long time...  Then, about 380,000 years after the moment of the Big Bang, the universe was large enough - and, finally, cool enough - that the first atoms could actually form. The first atoms consisted mainly of hydrogen, a much less amount of helium, and a trace of lithium - the 3 lightest elements on the Periodic Table.

    >>Space couldn't have just appeared, there had to be "nothingness" first, right? 

    It's open to conjecture... we don't know if our universe exists *inside* another, or along side any others, or if it's the only one there is... there's nowhere we can 'point' to and no instruments that can detect anything beyond our universe... So - for all intents and purposes... we think that Space/Time really did just sort of appear - and grow. 

    >>Sorry if this is too deep or whatever but I don't get it. 

    World-class physicists are still looking into it... There's no simple explanation.

    >>Also where even is space? I get Earth is in space, and galaxies are 

    >>located IN space but where is space.

    We know space is all around us, and spreading... but if there's a 'location' for our universe - we can't know what it is. At least, not yet.

    >> Is space located within nothingness? 

    Possibly. 

    >>If you kept traveling in one direction in space, would you 

    >>eventually run into the end of space? 

    It's thought that if you keep going in one direction in space, you'll eventually wind up back where you started...  An analogy:  Imagine you're on the surface of a beach ball, and it's inflating. You can't look out and away from the balls' surface, nor can you look *into* the ball... you can only see the surface.  You can travel forever on it, and never leave it, and you'd have no idea where that ball was located.  If you traveled straight across the surface, you'd eventually wind up where you started...

    >>So many questions, my bad.  I just want other's opinions on this, 

    >>I am very open minded.

    Keep the open mind... very few people have one anymore...

  • 4 weeks ago

    Positions in space are located some distance from other positions in space. All of space itself is not some distance from some other position because then that position wouldn’t be included in all of space. It’s like asking why is a square circle.

  • neb
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    It is highly unlikely that the universe came from true ‘nothing’. In our universe, true ‘nothing’ does not exist. We have replaced the notion of the classical vacuum with a quantum vacuum, which via the uncertainty principle, fluctuates with energy. The universe may be a fluctuation of a preexisting quantum vacuum (not necessarily the same quantum vacuum as our universe since quantum vacuums can have different energy levels). One could surmise the preexisting quantum vacuum is eternal and is fundamental reality with no need to come from classical ‘nothing’.

    The WMAP results indicate the universe is spatially ‘flat’ - zero curvature. That implies the universe is infinite (per general relativity) so you can travel an infinite distance in any direction without returning to a starting point as would be the case for a positively curved universe.

    General relativity also doesn’t require (but doesn’t prohibit) the universe to be embedded in any higher dimensional space, so what is ‘beyond’ the universe is likely the eternal quantum vacuum that gave rise to the universe. Obviously speculative, but based on modern physics.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Technically, space begins 68 miles straight up at the edge of the upper atmosphere and extends about 39 billion light years past that. This space contains all the stars, galaxies and matter known to exist. Beyond that, we don't know, physics suggest just more universe, an infinite void.

    Physics 101 you don't get something out of nothing, the front burner theory is all this matter started as a singularity, then a big bang, spewing all this matter and energy into this void. Some 14 billion years back, our galaxy formed, one of billions, stars,gasses, drawn together by gravity, with it, our solar system and the planets.

    Then some 3.5 billion years back, a biologic was able to live on earth and began life as we know it.

    10,000 scientists and as many notions of the origins of the universe, this is just one of them.

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  • poldi2
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    It started almost 14 billion years ago.

    https://www.esa.int/kids/en/learn/Our_Universe/Sto...

  • marty
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Around 13.8 billion years ago, all the matter in the Universe emerged from a single, minute point, or singularity, in a violent burst. This expanded at an astonishingly high rate and temperature, doubling in size every 10-34 seconds, creating space as it rapidly inflated.

    • buggi4 weeks agoReport

      I guess I just don't understand how matter just came to be. I understand the idea of the Big Bang, but I still don't get how something forms from nothing. Because matter had to have been created by something, it wasn't just sitting there for billions of years with no origin. 

  • Susie
    Lv 6
    4 weeks ago

    It’s good that you are open minded because there really is no definitive answers to those questions. Outer space is the area outside of the earth’s atmosphere. Since no one, that we know of, has traveled to the “end” of space, it is considered infinite.

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