What do I do if I am not getting the amount I am suppose to on my direct deposit?

Hello, I just turned 17 and I have a job a JCPenney. Please don’t make comments about how the are about to shut down. I never realize I was not getting that amount of work I put in until today. 10.25 an hour, I worked 29.5 hours within 2 weeks but only received 117 and some change. I tried talking to my guardians about it but they are busy and all counselors don’t seem to be helpful at all so maybe you all will be. What should I do, who should I contact, does this have anything to do with W-2 forms?

Update:

also, what are forms I need to take to get tax returns

12 Answers

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  • zipper
    Lv 6
    3 weeks ago

    They may be holding some money back, it does happen, plus you have income tax, unemployment tax, all of which comes out before you get your tiny share; it ain't fair: but who said that life is fair. It weren't me for sure!

  • 3 weeks ago

    Look at the paystub and see whether the problem is that the number of hours for which they paid you was too low or that the amount of tax they withheld was too high or something else.

  • 3 weeks ago

    It has nothing to do with W-2 forms.  Look at your pay stub.  It should list your total hours for the week and the deductions.  What's left is what you get.  If you think it is wrong, ask them.  There's no guarantee that you will get a tax return - refund.  It isn't the form that will do it, it is HOW you complete the form.  It will have been given to you by your employer, usually within your first three days of work.  If you filled it out to take the highest deductions from your pay checks, then that is the best assurance of obtaining a refund.

  • Judy
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    First, find out when the pay period is. It is NOT the last 14 days right before payday, it's farther back by several days - could be a week. Check when you worked during THAT time. The money for the last several days will be on your NEXT check. They take some money out of each check for taxes. What they take out does depend on what you put on your W-4, but not THAT much.If you still think you're short, talk to your supervisor.

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  • 3 weeks ago

    You don't get paid immediately for the work you did.  You will get paid based on a pay period and you will receive the payment about a week after the pay period.

    If you look at your pay stub, probably found in the JCP employee self service center, it will tell you the days that you are being paid for. 

    Remember that you also have to pay taxes.  So even if you worked 29.5 hours, you won't get a check for $295.00 because taxes are taken out of it.

    In January, JCP will give you your tax form (this is your W2) probably in their employee self service center.  When you get it, you can ask your guardians to help you file your taxes. 

    Congrats on your first job!!

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    Talk to your supervisor.

  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    talk to your job about it

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    Ask a coworker. Pay is delayed. You are not being cheated.

  • A.J.
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    Pay is by pay periods. Some of the hours could be in the next pay period. There should be more money coming. Do you have a statement that you should have that details the pay? There are deductions for income taxes, 7.65% FICA, and other possible deductions.ou may also have a tax refund for some income taxes after you file 2019 taxes.You still need the details and should have been told where to see it.

    You were probably paid for about 13 hours so far.

  • Judith
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    Why talk to your guardians about it?  You visit Human Resources and ask them what's up.  Only if you disagree with them would you need to bring the matter to your guardian's attention.

    As long as they have the correct # of hours you've worked and your hourly pay, then your take-home would be accurate.  Don't forget, they take out income and social security taxes.

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